'06 Target Marking


#1

A while back there was a thread that discussed 303 British drouge target marking cartridges with a soft green “paint”. I seem to remember a similar discussion on 30-06 target marking cartridges but I cannot find it.

Anyway, I have a DEN 42 with the soft green “paint”. What is the designation for this particular loading? I need to catalog mine.

Thanks

Ray


#2

The “soft” paint was applied in the field to be used when shooting at towed aircraft target sleeves.
The soft paint would transfer off the bullet onto the cloth sleeve, thus indicating who hit the sleeve.
Different shooters would have different color paint on their bullets.
Gregg


#3

The marking “Paint” was not actually paint. It was Lithographic Ink.


#4

[quote=“Gregg”]The “soft” paint was applied in the field to be used when shooting at towed aircraft target sleeves.
The soft paint would transfer off the bullet onto the cloth sleeve, thus indicating who hit the sleeve.
Different shooters would have different color paint on their bullets.
Gregg[/quote]

So Gregg, there is no official designation for the cartridges? I have both red and green, by the way. DEN 42 and DEN 43.

So, how do you catalog yours??

Thanks for the info

Ray


#5

Ray–I can not speak for the .30-06 Sleeve Marker rounds, but I have had experience with .50 BMG. We used standard rounds which were dipped after linking. We would take the entire string, usually 100 rounds and roll them up together. Then the entire roll was dipped, bullet point down, into a pan with about 3/4 inch of the lithographic ink, which came in about 10 colors. This was done perhaps 1 hour before loading into the aircraft guns.

There was no special designation for the dipped rounds. In fact, rounds in collectors hands with this ink still in place were most likely “Liberated” rounds as the standard procedure, if any rounds were left unfired (usually only if the gun jammed), was to wipe off the ink before returning the ammo to storage. The closest to a designation was to call them “Sleeve Marker” rounds as the target was a cloth or canvas cone shaped sleeve that was towed about 1000 yards behind the tow aircraft. The target sleeve was deployed from a underwing reel of cable and then reeled back in for landing.


#6

I only have a few, both 30-06 and 50 Browning in my collection.
They are not rare by any means, but they are getting more uncommon as the years go on.
I have them in the “odd ball” drawer of my collection.
Gregg


#7

As delicate as that “paint” is, it’s a wonder that any of them have survived.

It’s interesting that long range (1000 yards) Benchrest shooters still use target marking bullets to test different loads. Each bullet is marked with a different color and you record the sequence. When the target is checked you can tell where shot #1 went, and so forth. The difference is that today we use Magic Markers to “paint” the bullets.

Ray