1" Gatling Gun Canister round


#1

Does anyone have any idea as to the history and possible value of a 1" Gatling Canister round? It is a “cutaway” supposedly presented to the Navy. It has 21 0.45" lead balls behind a 1" conical bullet.


#2

hello, can I have picture, please?


#3

jj

I’m not sure what you’re asking.

Canister is like a big shotgun shell. They (Langrage, Grape & Canister) date back to the very beginnings of gunpowder and cannons. They’re used to mow down troops all in a nice line. Very lethal and efficient. They’re called by different names today now that we are more humane.

Gatling canister dates to the mid to late 1800s.

I have no idea of the value. Probably worth a few dollars more than an average big cartridge.

Ray


#4

[quote=“Ray Meketa”]jj

I’m not sure what you’re asking.

Canister is like a big shotgun shell. They date back to the very beginnings of gunpowder and cannons. They’re used to mow down troops all in a nice line. Very lethal and efficient. They’re called by different names today now that we are more humane.

Gatling canister dates to the mid to late 1800s.

I have no idea of the value. Probably worth a few dollars more than an average big cartridge.

Ray[/quote]

Is it inside primed or, exterior primed centerfire ?? Does it have a big “slug” type bullet followed by several tiers of .45 balls ?
Or, is it just loaded with the .45 balls ? M. Rea


#5

any chance to have a picture?


#6

It sounds like this is what you’re looking for?

If so, value would be around $350 or so.


#7

Thank you, I had a loaded round but never want to dismantled it!


#8

[quote=“Rich B”]It sounds like this is what you’re looking for?

If so, value would be around $350 or so.[/quote]

Would it be possible to get some dimensional information from this round? OAL, Case length, dia, etc???

Thank you


#9

I will post a photo and dimensions as soon as I can.

jjoral


#10

[quote=“m d rea”][quote=“Ray Meketa”]jj

I’m not sure what you’re asking.

Canister is like a big shotgun shell. They date back to the very beginnings of gunpowder and cannons. They’re used to mow down troops all in a nice line. Very lethal and efficient. They’re called by different names today now that we are more humane.

Gatling canister dates to the mid to late 1800s.

I have no idea of the value. Probably worth a few dollars more than an average big cartridge.

Ray[/quote]

Ray,

It is inside primed and similar to the one photo posted already but it has twenty one 0.45" lead balls behind the main conical bullet.

Is it inside primed or, exterior primed centerfire ?? Does it have a big “slug” type bullet followed by several tiers of .45 balls ?
Or, is it just loaded with the .45 balls ? M. Rea[/quote]


#11

Please see the following links:

s598.photobucket.com/albums/tt69 … atling.jpg

s598.photobucket.com/albums/tt69 … =Shell.jpg


#12

[quote=“556guy”][quote=“Rich B”]It sounds like this is what you’re looking for?

If so, value would be around $350 or so.[/quote]

Would it be possible to get some dimensional information from this round? OAL, Case length, dia, etc???

Thank you[/quote]

Please see the following:

s598.photobucket.com/albums/tt69 … =Shell.jpg


#13

The bar-primed examples of these 1" Gatling cartridges as shown in the first picture above with the grooves in side of case that are down close to the rim were first produced in 1866 or 1867. The Benet-primed examples, such as the second example pictured with the higher grooves, were produced beginning about 1868 and into the 1870s. There is also a brass, externally primed (Berdan), unheadstamped example of this long canister style case, also called the .90 Gatling. It originally would have been loaded with the small caliber cannister balls, topped with a .90 caliber projectile. Here’s a picture of one: