10.5x70R Russian Hunting


#1

I found information about a 10.5x70R Russian Hunting cartridge on a German language site.
Translation of notation with picture read: “partial coating (jacket?) to bullet. Hunting cartridge of inferior quality. USSR”

Does anyone have information about this cartridge? i.e., Who developed this cartridge? When was this cartridge extant? What firearm used it? Black powder or smokeless? Bullet weight, muzzle velocity?


#2

Hello,

I have one of these rounds as well, it was unloaded.
Actually, the lower picture in your posting shows my cartridge.

The bullet jacket of this projectile is actually a tube, open at both ends and filled wit a solid lead slug. The bullet jacket is very thick, approximately 1mm.

I once made an inquiry in the ECRA Journal and asked fopr details, but there was no reply…
Chris


#3

Hello All,
Could someone post the dimensions of the cartridge?
Thanks in advance.
Brian


#4

Brian, there you go:

The headstamp reads: USSR 32 81 (the leg of the letter “R” is only faint, but definitively there)
Bullet weight: 24.44 grams
Bullet length: 30.7 mm
The bullet envelope looks like it was turned from a tube or a solid piece of copper. I actually don


#5

Thanks russianammo,
The case does not seem to be based on anything existing (that I can see).
I have always assumed that there were some local cartridges developed in Russia for hunting or specialized non-military uses. It’s just human nature for firearms enthuasiasts (gun nuts) to do this regardless of the political climate.

All the best,
Brian


#6

[quote=“clarkbr”]Thanks russianammo,
The case does not seem to be based on anything existing (that I can see).
I have always assumed that there were some local cartridges developed in Russia for hunting or specialized non-military uses. It’s just human nature for firearms enthuasiasts (gun nuts) to do this regardless of the political climate.

All the best,
Brian[/quote]

The USSR developed a whole array of hunting and sporting calibers which are rather unknown in the west.


#7

EOD, would you expand on your comment? I know that the Russians made 8,2x66sr and 9x66sr cartridges, and they “necked up” their 7.62x54R military cartridge to make the 8,2x54R (or was that just the Finns?) and 9,3x54R cartridges. I have heard rumors of other possible home-grown sporting cartridges from the late 19th and first half of the 20th centuries for use in “Berdana” rifles. Most of these being shortened and/or necked down versions of the 10.75mm Berdan blackpowder cartridge. Are you aware of any (many?) others? Can you shed some more light on these cartridges.


#8

Please excuse my ignorance to hunting cartridges. I just come across them every now and then when I evaluate Russian documents on military ammunition.

Those I remember are for example:

9x64SR Blyum (similar to the 9.3x64 Russia makes today for export and as sniper cartridge)

Basing on the 7.62x39R Nagant revolver cartridge there were three different cartridges:

  • 7.62mm with the projectile outside the case
  • 6.5mm with the projectile outside the case
  • 5.6mm with the projectile outside the case

Basing on the 7.62x54R case:

  • 5.6x47R with long shoulder

Basing on the 7.62x39:

  • 5.6x46 Biathlon cartrdige

Unknown cartridge, hunting or even military small caliber, anyway experimental:
5.6x45R (CWS, looks like a scaled down 7.62x54R)


#9

I, too, know little about Russian sproting rifle cartridges, but I know that there were several using different bullet diameters based on the 7.62 x 54R case. However, I really chimed in to ask a question. It was said that the headstamp is “USSR” and a point was made about the "tail on the “R” so I assume that is in the Latin Alphabet. I don’t understand why a cartridge that seems to have been made for internal hunting use in Russia would be stamped “USSR” instead of the Cyrillic version “CCCP”? Any comments on that?


#10

John,

that is a very good point! - Unfortunately I have no idea!

This cartridge remains mysterious!
Chris


#11

I think, it is necked down soviet 32 gauge case (32x70) Stamp on base - is the stamp of 32 gauge Soviet cases.


#12

I think, this is correct. I have several of this original 32Gauge cases in brass and steel configurations. All bear an open stamp of USSR, the caliber and the year of manufacture.
Its easy to swage them, to the dimensions, mentioned for the 10,5x70R.
They cannot be for the MN-Nagant Rifle, converted to this caliber, as the OAL will be to long, to fit into the framework of the rifle.
A single shot loading trough the back would work, if you take the bolt out…but I doubt, that russiam hunters will do such a work. In 1981 (as the cartridge mark indicates, where much better solutions on the market).
Most hunters, which I encounter in Russia, using either shotguns, with partially rifling, so they can use both (Slugs with good accuracy and shotshells), or relative modern hunting rifles in 9,3x54R, some in .308M (=modernized) -more or less a 7,62x51 in western standard configurations and the big 9,3x64 (a copy of the german Brenneke Magnum round).

In no way, this 10,5x70R is a factory product…its more a homemade thing. Maybe for some homeconverted rifles. But if, what type of Rifle, as the action of the 10,7mm Berdan II Rifle will also be to short, to handle such a long cartridge.
And I do not knew, of any barrel fabricated in 42lines (10,66mm) in the last years after the WW2…

Forensic