12.7 mm ammunition for Japan

The Japanese Army also tested the MG131 during 1942-43 but it was never adopted (with special interest on the remote-controlled gun on the ME-210).

Another interesting fact is that the Navy acquired manufacturing rights to produce the ammunition on August 24, 1944 and on September of the same year the rights to manufacture the links. A contract was also signed with Germany for the supply to Japan of tools for the manufacture of steel cases but there is no evidence that it was ever completed. During 1943 Japan also tried the 15 mm MG151.

Yes, so they did - I can’t read my own reference book!

The data I have of the armament of those Zeroes which used the Type 3 is as follows:

A6M5b (470 built) - 1x7.7mm cowling, 1x13.2mm cowling, 2x20mm Type 99-2 wings

A6M5c/M7 (243 built) - 1x13.2mm cowling, 2x13.2mm wings, 2x20mm Type 99-2 wings

A6M8 (2 built) - 2x13.2 wings, 2x20mm Type 99-2 wings

[quote=“Fede”]The Japanese Army also tested the MG131 during 1942-43 but it was never adopted (with special interest on the remote-controlled gun on the ME-210).

Another interesting fact is that the Navy acquired manufacturing rights to produce the ammunition on August 24, 1944 and on September of the same year the rights to manufacture the links. A contract was also signed with Germany for the supply to Japan of tools for the manufacture of steel cases but there is no evidence that it was ever completed. [/quote]
There is an organisation which researches Pacific wrecks and they contacted me some years ago to identify some military hardware recovered from the sea, believed to be in transit from Germany to Japan. As I recall, this included some 13x64B percussion-primed ammo.

Tony: Every time I try to arrange the details of Japanese ordnance in my mind I find myself thinking of the house that Jack built. It seems to be an impossible task! Jack (but not the same one I hope)

The German ordnance quagmire was far worse.