12,7 x 99 made by MMM in Spain: a box


#1

This is a 100-round metal box from the spanish firm MMM (Manufacturas Metálicas Madrileñas, Madrid Metal Works). The ammunition division was taken over by Santa Bárbara in 1970.

The MMM ammunition division made ammo in 12,7 x 99 caliber for the Spanish air force only. If I remember well these cartridges were for the machine guns on board of the Sabre jets. The guns were Browning M3 (a shortened version of the M2) and they used M15 belt links. As far as I know, only M8 API and M20 APIT types were loaded.

The cartridges on M15 links should look similar to these ones (these are on M15A2 links for the M85 machine gun).

Here’s a view of the MMM factory from an ad in a 1955 newspaper.


#2

Can a Browning M2 be modified to take the M15 (vs M9) link? I know the Canadians modified some M1919A4s to take the 7.62 X 51 in the push through link used with the M60 MG, but I hadn’t known that “Ma Deuce” was modified in this way also. Of course, the action can be shorter for a “push through” link, so it is more feasible to modify a “pull out” action, such as BMG M2, to “push through” than the “vice versa” of modifying an action to accomodate a LONGER requirement.


#3

Does anybody know the difference between M15 and M15A2 links? (And M15A1 too, if there was such a number).


#4

Schneider, I have finally found my links. I have never seen a M15A1.

Left M15A2, right M15


#5

I think there is some “cross Purpose” here. The M3 Gun of the Sabre jet vintage is the M3 Gun developed during WW II ( higher rate of fire than the standard M2 Aircraft gun ( AN-M2 .50 cal).) Both Guns used the Standard .50 cal “pull out” link.

The M15 series of “push thru” link were developed with the (Failed) M85 series of “ramming” short receiver guns…and subsequenly Singapore (CIS) used the M15 series of Links successfully in their alternate feed Guns of 1980s development.
The Various A modifications relate to the folding of the link arms, etc, for tension purposes. One of the M85 ( and M73? 7,62)problems was the low “ramming” power leading to Misfed rounds and belt jams.

For the development of the High rate M3 series, look at Chinn (The Machine Gun)…Most M3 parts are not interchangeable with the earlier M2)

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics…Now I know how to say “Linked” in Spanish ( Engrapados" ( literally “Grabbed”)