122mm Russian case with possible South American connection


#1

See this thread on BOCN For the info:

http://www.bocn.co.uk/vbforum/threads/80446-122-x-446R-D30-Howitzer-case-from-Spanish-speaking-country?highlight=tirado

Can anyone tell me anything more about this?

Can you help Fede?

Thanks for any info.


#2

Hello Falcon, in this context the Spanish word “Tirado” means “Fired”. It could also mean “throwed” like in “throwed in the trash”.

Several sources in English language describes the D-30 loads as “Full” and “Reducible” (with five removable increments). The Spanish word “Reducible” means exactly the same as in English.

The only South American country still using this howitzer is Peru (36 units in service) but I have no idea if your case is related. Maybe it was marked elsewhere (Cuba, Central America, etc.).

I hope you don’t mind if I add a link to the pictures for everyone to see:


#3

This case was loaded in China, so we can assume it to be made there as well since the 4 digit code range fits China too.


#4

This case looks like it has not been fired.

“Throwed” would make sense if it was disposed of. The closest English word in this case would be “Scrapped” as in sent to be used for scrap metal. It appears that a fibre tip type pen was used to write “TIRADO” which appears to me that it was done recently.

What I would like to know is how this case found its way from Peru or another country to England. Perhaps a tourist bought it at a market in a South American country as a souvenir.


#5

Most likely scrap metal bought from a tin can republic. To my experience this is the most common source for such ones.


#6

It’s a beautiful case and score, Falcon! Nice seeing the big stuff :-)

Jason


#7

Since the case is New, could the word “Tirado” mean “Drawn” ( the charge and primer have been “Drawn” Out, before disposal – “Retirado” means “Withdrawn, Removed”)???
The end result is that the case can then be scrapped.

Regards,
Doc AV


#8

Jason, this case is not actually mine, it belongs to a friend of mine who has around 100 different artillery cases for sale.

EOD: The same person who owns this case says that during the 1990s a friend of his imported container loads of cases from Uganda for scrap. He says that if he would have known me at the time he would probably have rescued some for the collector market. We will probably never know where the Tirado case came from as he bought it in an estate sale.


#9

Falcon, if this case comes from Africa it could have been originated in Portuguese speaking countries like Angola or Mozambique (both had/have D-30 in their inventory). Another translation who works for both Spanish and Portuguese is “discarded”.


#10

Sorry Fede, I wasn’t clear there.

The African cases were imported to England in the 1990s and have been melted for scrap years ago.

My friend bought this case and around 100 others last year in a sale of a collection from a house where the owner had died.


#11

[quote=“Falcon”]Jason, this case is not actually mine, it belongs to a friend of mine who has around 100 different artillery cases for sale.

EOD: The same person who owns this case says that during the 1990s a friend of his imported container loads of cases from Uganda for scrap. He says that if he would have known me at the time he would probably have rescued some for the collector market. We will probably never know where the Tirado case came from as he bought it in an etate sale.[/quote]

So it fit’s well. I remember when we got about 7EA 40ft containers with scrap metal from Angola to the port of Hamburg in 1994. These containers contained everything you could imagine that was ever made from colored metals. Starting with fuselages and wing sections of Russian jet fighters up to helicopters including their LIFE armament including a 100-150kg life missile warhead. Plenty of large brass cases included.

We all remember those Cuban 7.62x39 draw pieces that came out of a scrap load many years ago. I do not recall the details anymore but the story was told here on the forum already.


#12

Were there any South African made artillery cases in that lot? I have never seen any South African made ammunition above 30mm calibre.


#13

No South African’s there.
All I recall was Russian, Chinese, French and Czech.


#14

The French cases were probably supplied covertly to South Africa. I know that they got alot of supplies from France.

Do you remember what calibres they were?


#15

The French were 20x82 MG151. These definately came through South-Africa since the SADF used them in Angola during the war in the 1980’s.