15x105mm APIT?


#1

Center cartridge flanked by Soviet 12.7 APIT and 14.5 API. Unusual two-piece brass case with purple over red tip color. Case markings indicate manufacture in China. Any ideas?

AKMS


#2

Sorry but it looks like a garage job.


#3

The colored markings look OK to me. What about the cartridge is not right?

AKMS


#4

The fact that the case is in two pieces? And that judging by the shoulder it looks to be machined rather than drawn?


#5

It looks much like being made on a lathe. The shoulder is to sharp and the case is made of 2 parts.
Can you show us a close up of the case head (45 degree rear view)


#6

Well, I can’t sneak anything past you guys!

I found this at a souvenir shop in Lake George, New York last week. I added the case mouth seal and tip colors. They had two variations. One type has a copper projectile and the other has a brass projectile. They all came packed in a plastic link-belt that was very realistic. Best $5 I have spent in a while!
These are purpose-built and do not appear to have any actual cartridge related componants in them. Someone (in China) went to a lot of effort to make a realistic appearing HMG round that functions as a butane lighter.

AKMS[/img]


#7

Well, we did not fell off the paddy waggon yesterday :)


#8

Can you please post a picture of the plastic link belt.

Besides “real” belts and links, I am also collecting any kind of surrogates.

Thanks

JFL


#9

I do not have the plastic belt, as they were not for sale, only used to display the “cartridges”. You might try contacting the company that had these for sale.

Lake George Trading Company

www.mytradingcompany.com

AKMS


#10

AKMS - I can’t find those on that site. I think to get to them, you have to give these people your email address, password, etc. I don’t want to get on their mailing list yet and be deluged with junk mail. Do you know how many different “cartridges” they had in these things. I have one that is basically a giant 9mm Luger round.

John Moss


#11

EOD

That is great!!! The best mixing of metaphors I’ve seen in a long time. Are you related to Yogi Berra? ;) :) :)

Ray


#12

EOD

That is great!!! The best mixing of metaphors I’ve seen in a long time. Are you related to Yogi Berra? ;) :) :)

Ray[/quote]

Ray, no I do not know Yogi Berra/Yogi Bear (I’m not into baseball). I’m just a foreigner who likes to expand his personal dictionary. These are words of a native US citizen (Indian) I met once in the internet.
He used it after he came back from a weekend in Vegas. Since then it it is burned into my brain.


#13

EOD my friend"

“On the Wagon” (I’ve stopped getting drunk all the time; I don’t drink anymore).

“I Fell off the wagon” (I’m getting drunk all the time again; I am drinking (alcohol) again).

“I wasn’t born yesterday” (I am not easily fooled).

Now, this is a cartridge Forum so I will get in trouble if I don’t justify this response with a cartridge entry:

“Bite the bullet” (take it like a man, swallow your disappointment, don’t show the pain, etc. ad nauseum).

Your wunderlicht friend,

John Moss


#14

Didn’t the pahrase “bite the bullet” allegedly come from when someone who had been on the wrong end of a Native American arrow was told to bight down hard on a soft lead bullet when they were having the arrow pulled out of them, as biting down hard would help reduce the pain?


#15

[quote=“JohnMoss”]EOD my friend"

“On the Wagon” (I’ve stopped getting drunk all the time; I don’t drink anymore).

“I Fell off the wagon” (I’m getting drunk all the time again; I am drinking (alcohol) again).

“I wasn’t born yesterday” (I am not easily fooled).

Now, this is a cartridge Forum so I will get in trouble if I don’t justify this response with a cartridge entry:

“Bite the bullet” (take it like a man, swallow your disappointment, don’t show the pain, etc. ad nauseum).

Your wunderlicht friend,

John Moss[/quote]

John, that really brings some light to it (for me as a guest in your language).
Thanks a lot!


#16

EOD

Yogi Berra was/is famous for his sayings. Here are three of my favorites:

[i][b]It ain’t over until it’s over.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

They pay you in cash, which is just as good as money.[/b][/i]

Ray


#17

My Dutch grandfather used to say:

“I did not fall off the turnip truck yesterday!”

As for these “Bullet Lighters”, I think there were some smaller caliber types, but I honestly was not interested in them at all. This large one really caught my eye as well as the plastic link belt. We do not go over that way too often, but next time I will look into getting a pic of the belt.

AKMS


#18

[quote=“Ray Meketa”]EOD

Yogi Berra was/is famous for his sayings. Here are three of my favorites:

[i][b]It ain’t over until it’s over.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

They pay you in cash, which is just as good as money.[/b][/i]

Ray[/quote]

Ray, I looked it up in the internet. Good to know these things they make you move easier in a language.


#19

Falcon - for every expression, you find ten explanations of where and how it originated. The version you said is just as good and likely as any other. It probably started in the Civil War, when surgery was close to butchery and there were two kinds of wounds, scratches and fatal. I’ve read that when out of anesthetic, which was common, they had soldiers bite down on something to try to keep them still. But, the expression could go back as far almost as the beginning of bullets. Who really knows? Probably no one.

There are other gun-related expressions - “lock, stock and barrel,” and a “flash in the pan” come to mind. Well, probably off title, but kind of fun. Life isn’t all headstamps and case types.


#20

At a Revolutionary War site here in Vermont, annual re-enactments take place and the re-enactors set up camps for visitors to explore. One gentleman who is there every year portrays a “doctor” of the era. Among his many period-authentic artifacts such as amputation knives and saws, horrible tooth extraction tools and the like are several lead musket balls with unmistakable teeth marks in them! A couple of measures of liquor to dull the pain, a musket ball between the teeth and off comes the arm or leg!

AKMS