1945 dated Soviet 7.62x54r question


#1

I just picked up some 1945 vintage Soviet made 7.62x54r ball ammunition.

It is unusual in two ways. First, the headstamp has three elements, evenly spaced in a 3x120 degree arrangement. The headstamp consists of the factory code “17”, the year “45” and presumably the month of manufacture “4” or “5”. Why the unusual headstamp, when normally only the factory code and year are used?

Secondly, the steel jacket is plated with what looks like brass instead of the normal copper. Any idea why?

This appears to be normal copper washed steel case “L” ball ammunition.

AKMS


#2

[quote=“AKMS”]I just picked up some 1945 vintage Soviet made 7.62x54r ball ammunition.

It is unusual in two ways. First, the headstamp has three elements, evenly spaced in a 3x120 degree arrangement. The headstamp consists of the factory code “17”, the year “45” and presumably the month of manufacture “4” or “5”. Why the unusual headstamp, when normally only the factory code and year are used?

Secondly, the steel jacket is plated with what looks like brass instead of the normal copper. Any idea why?

This appears to be normal copper washed steel case “L” ball ammunition.

AKMS[/quote]

The scheme of headstamping this cartridge is a little bit unusuall in comparison with standrds of 1920-1930th for USSR. But, the same way as we already discussed with 7,62x25 TT cartridges, in 1943-1945 some cartridge factories use additional marking of month of production for 7,62x54R cartridges. It was used to control quality in conditions of big volumes of mass production during WWII. For some ather plants in this period we can meet a markings with manufacture code at 12 o’clock, year at 6 o’clock and month at 9 o’clock.

The bullet type L with copper washed steel envelope is War “ersatz” version, manufactured in conditions of frequent shortage of tombac. For example, also existed L bullet with zink plated steel jacket.


#3

Here is interesting link:
karel-val.narod.ru/spravochnik/m … ka_v12.doc


#4

Treshkin,

Thanks for that information. I knew about the zinc plated jackets, but the brass ones are new to me!

Gregory,

Looks like some great information. Too bad I do not read or speak Russian. Are there any good (and free) online translation webistes that I can get this document translated at?

AKMS


#5

I haven’t used any translator, because I speak a little Russian.