1945 Guam Era Casing for what Round?


#1

New User here… looks like a very well run site!! Kudos to the forum…and managers!!

Attached is a picture of a casing from 1945 Era possibly Navy - D= 1 5/8th; H= 2" Center fire

Looking for the Type of Round… and any History regarding it. Thanks in advance.

If not posting in correct location please advise -


#2

I like your shot cups because I was based on Guam in 1965/66. The U.S. Navy was pretty busy wrapping up WW II in 1945 and Guam and the other Marianas had lots of U.S servicemen who would have been happy to make these from fired shells. It would be very helpful to have a photo of the same high quality of the one you posted of the base of one or more, if they are different, of the bottoms of the cups so we can see the headstamps.


#3

Hi Mel,

Here’s a pic of one of six- 3 of which look exactly like this one - not much info available to validate the round.

Thanks kindly for your response!

Barry

image1.jpeg


#4

These are most likely made from Japanese 25 mm Type 96 Hotchkiss casings. Which were very popular for making into “trench art” mementoes such as this.

Example 25mm Type 96 with shipping plug in the projectile and cartridge case head with headstamp:

25%2C%20a

25%2C%20b

Brian


#5

Barry; I think Brian nailed it for you. Very nice set.


#6

Brian / Mel

This possibly could be it… yet when I look at what I have in hand, it still doesn’t quit fit the casing profile - will continue add’l research and get back to both of you as to what I find. Thanks kindly for your help! Have a great weekend!

Barry


#7

Barry,

The reason the cup does not exactly match the 25mm case profile is that when these cups were made on a lathe material was removed from the case just above the rim and material was removed from the rim. The grooves were made and then the case head was separated from the case. So in essence the situation here is artistic license and how much brass was removed from the case head in making the cups. As a result these cups will not exactly match the profile of any cartridge case.

Brian


#8

Thanks Brian!

Would not imagined that much conversion machining to get that point! Appreciate you insight and info.

Learning something new each day!

Barry