1963 Lake City 7.62 Match

Found these at the bottom of my collection. Is 1963 the first year of Lake City Match?

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Mister19; HWS Vol. III, page 185: “Lake City Army Ammunition Plant had started production of the XM118 Match in December 1963 with Lot LC 12000 …”

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Why did they switch the match producing arsenal? Is LC bigger/better than FA? Never went to either.

Why? I don’t know. I’ll ask Frank Hackley, who was the commanding officer of both, and post his answer here.

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National Match lots were chosen through testing lots put forth by suitable ammunition suppliers. So the best lots got used.

By why? Good call Mel, I’m sure Frank knows the reason.

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Here’s Frank’s answer to the question: “Frankford Arsenal’s mission in peace time was basically Engineering and R&D and for this reason did not maintain a large production base. After a round was developed and completed the manufacturing engineering phase, the normal procedure was to transfer production to Lake City AAP for rounds that were to be produced for an” extended period." The production of U.S. Army ammunition is basically financed by what is called the “The Five-Year Plan” and the planner at the Army staff in the Pentagon Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations (DCSOPS) would have included the 7.62mm Match M118 in that plan, based on a continuing need. From a quality standpoint, FA was usually a bit better than LCAAP because of the Arsenal’s equipment, larger engineering staff and talent. However, LC, after getting started, often exceeded quality standards that had been previously set by FA."

For those who might not know, Colonel Frank W. Hackley, Ordnance, Retired, was the Commanding Officer of the Lake City Army Ammunition Plant from 1968-1970 and the Commanding Officer of Frankford Arsenal from 1976-1977.

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It should be added, in case someone reading this thread might be unaware of the fact, that Frank Hackley is also one of the three highly esteemed co-authors of the definitive study “History of Modern U.S. Military Small Arms Ammunition” 3 volumes (so far…), along with the late William Woodin and Eugene Scranton.

Mel Carpenter completed the editing and publishing of Volume three.

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How about these two? Never mind, I posted .30-06’s but the thread is about 7.62x51. I saw the headstamps in a pile and posted them. Haste makes waste.
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