.22 Dardick Tround - ID

I aquired some trounds. They came in a .38 Dardick box but are obviously no .38.
There are basically two variations (translucent plastic insert and green plastic insert):
Ø13,15mm, Length: 34,35mm, Weight: 110gr.


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The bullet is slightly corroded but meassures Ø5,74mm, Length15,88mm Weight: 44gr. Softpoint
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The green plastic isnert meassures Ø9,79mm Length: 19,62mm Weight: 10gr.
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The primer is a small pistol integrated into a brass part
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I am aware that there are many variations of Dardicks available. But can anyone tell me a litte bit more?
Thanks in advance

Cheers

Jo

Jo; Thanks for taking the bullet out and measuring it. I haven’t done that yet. When the Dardick (founded in 1954) pistol came out it was available in two basic calibers; .38 and .22. although the first handmade prototype was in .32 caliber. The first production pistol was the Model 1500, which held 15 Trounds (Triangular Round) and it was followed by the smaller Model 1100. The guns had interchangeable barrels, one .38 and the other .22, that were secured to the gun’s frame by a single straight slot screw. To use the .22 Trounds without modifying the pistol in any way, the Tround cases were the same for both .38 and .22. and, as your pics show, an insert to hold the .223 softnose bullet. Your Tround is a centerfire and if you look closely at the next to last photo, the brass primer holder, you can see the faint remnants of the headstamp: “D C .38” at about 4 o’clock. Lots of Trounds have faint parts of headstamps, full well-stamped headstamps, or just plain. Some primer holders are aluminum, plain or headstamped. Dardick also sold a .22 rimfire adapter case, just like your green one, to hold a normal .22 rimfire. It could easily be reloaded by simply pushing the fired case out and inserting a new cartridge. There is a small selector screw on the frame by the hammer to choose between centerfire and rimfire by changing the position of the firing pin.

These things are very interesting and I’m writing a book covering their history, so hopefully there will be a lot more information to come.

@Mel:
I did hope that you would answer on my thread.
Thank you - very informative!
Jo