.222 HV, .221 Colt, Davis Bushmaster....Which is correct


#1

I have a couple of cartridges I am cataloging but am confused as to the correct name and/or designation.
I have two cartidges with the same case, primer and h/s R - P and different projectiles.
One supposedly came out of a military box labelled .222 HV and supposedly has an alloy core
The other one came from a very reputable US auction house and was sold as a .221 Colt - Davis Bushmaster aka .221 Rem
What exactly is the correct name if there is one?


#2

craigt

Before anyone can even begin to help it would be a good idea to take a photo of the cartridges, side by side, along with a reference cartridge such as a 222 Remington or some such.

Then, do a search of the old threads. These cartridges have been discussed several times before and you need the background from those discussions.

And don’t put 100% faith in a “reputable US auction house”. Those guys are not necessarily experts on the US experimentals and can make mistakes too.

Good luck.

Ray


#3

In the photo,
.22 APG, then what I have cataloged as a .222 High Velocity which would appear to be correct after checking previous topics.
Then what I have been told is a .221 Colt, this appears identical to the .222 HV apart from the projectile. Shown with a 5.56x45 to compare against.
Is the .221??? a legitimate complete round or has someone just chucked a projectile into a NPE?


#4

craigt

The hollow point load has an aluminum core and there are boxes known to exist that are hand labeled 222 HIGH VELOCITY and 222 SHORT MAGNUM. So, I think you have it labeled correct. There are still a lot of questions as to the purpose of the cartridge.

It’s my opinion that the soft point R-P is simply one that somebody loaded themselves. I have seen the reference to a “Colt-Davis” connection but have never seen anything to document it. I think there may be some confusing it with the Colt SCAMP project which first considered using the 221 Fireball.

The cartridge you call the 22 APG was named the 22 CARBINE by it’s designer G.A. Gustafson. Gustafson’s original cartridge was loaded with a 41 grain commercial SP bullet and I have labeled my original as the 22 GUSTAFSON. Since Gustafson worked for APG at the time I suppose 22 APG is also a legitimate name although I have never seen anything official calling it that. During the SALVO trials it was called the CARBINE CAL .22.

There is also the 22 IMP cartridge but it uses a commercial 221 REM case.

I believe the “Bushmaster” was always a 5.56x45, wasn’t it?

All of this is strictly my own opinion.

Ray


#5

The Davis Arm Gun became the Colt IMP, and was reportedly designated GUU-4/P by the USAF. The Gwinn Bushmaster came later and was chambered in 5.56x45mm.


#6

Daniel, Was the Davis Arm Gun associated with Dale Davis at the AF Armament Lab at Eglin or was this something else?


#7

Lew: Yes, that is the same person.

You can find his patent here:

US Patent #3611872 - Lightweight Compact Rifle

Links to all of Davis’ patents

Also, there is a report available for free download through DTIC that covers Colt’s development of the IMP.

Lightweight Rifle/Submachine Gun


#8

After re-reading my post I can see where I didn’t word it very well and may have caused some confusion. I said, in part:

It’s my opinion that the soft point R-P is simply one that somebody loaded themselves. I have seen the reference to a “Colt-Davis” connection but have never seen anything to document it. I think there may be some confusing it with the Colt SCAMP project which first considered using the 221 Fireball.

What I meant was that I have seen the references to the R-P case having a “Colt-Davis” connection. I did not mean to imply that there was no Colt-Davis firearm. That prototype used the 221 Remington Fireball ammunition, not the R-P cartridge and we now know it as the IMP. The R-P cartridge was a Frankford Arsenal experimental.

Ray