3 x 303 I D's


#1

Hi Folks, I need help to correctly ID these 3 British military 303’s, they are

1.headstamp is K68 7Z this round has a PURPLE tip and Purple primer seal, case is neck coned into bullet
2. headstamp K 24 V11 a wood bulleted blank ,plain round nose wood ,case neck coned to bullet, purple primer seal

  1. headstamp K32 V11 also a wood bulleted blank,this one is a plain pointed bullet ,no neck crimping, no primer seal

All rounds made by Kynoch but I can find no other info on these particular variations Thanks Randy


#2

Without packet labels it is not possible to identify your rounds with certainty.

A purple tip is the normal way to identify an experimental or test load. It could be a primer test, a propellant trial or anything. It is unlikely to be a proof loading (although Kynoch did use this method of marking on commercial proof loads) as I would expect a proof round to have a purple stripe either on the side of the case or across the head.

The two wood bulleted blanks are probably simply commercial blanks made for overseas customers to use in MGs. During the inter war period Kynoch made quite a lot of these type of blank. The later one could also be part of the trials the RAF held to find a suitable blank round for the Lewis gun, which came to naught.

I have both of these types and several others, but as I say, the label holds the key to accurate identification but it is rare to find one.

Regards
TonyE


#3

[quote=“randy”]Hi Folks, I need help to correctly ID these 3 British military 303’s, they are

1.headstamp is K68 7Z this round has a PURPLE tip and Purple primer seal, case is neck coned into bullet
2. headstamp K 24 V11 a wood bulleted blank ,plain round nose wood ,case neck coned to bullet, purple primer seal

  1. headstamp K32 V11 also a wood bulleted blank,this one is a plain pointed bullet ,no neck crimping, no primer seal

All rounds made by Kynoch but I can find no other info on these particular variations Thanks Randy[/quote]
HELLO RANDY

while the “k” could designate Kynoch, it may not be it could stand for “kirkee” which is india but i think your dead on with it being British, the purple primer and bullet sealant could mean any experimental round not too sure but the “vii” is the roman numeral 7 for the type of bullet used, its known as mk7 or mark 7, it is a bullet of three part construction, it has an aluminum tip back filled with lead and a copper plated steel jacket, the original idea was for cost saving but they found out later that it had an application, they found it stable in flight but tended to shake when it hit its target and thus caused a wound greater channel, the corresponding number after the “K” is most likely the year of manufacture>> i sincerely hope i was of some help and im looking forward to chatting with anyone here>> your friend joe


#4

Hi Joe

Welcome to the board.

These rounds are as Randy says, made by Kynoch. The Kirkee monogram was K^F, not K.

The idea of the aluminium tip to the Mark 7 bullet was to place the centre of gravity as far to the rear as possible to provide ballistic stability. The additional effect of a tumbling bullet was a result of this.

The use of aluminium was not to save costs, as aluminium is far more expensive than lead. When they wanted to save aluminium is both WW1 and WW2 they used a substitute material, usually paper fibre or ceramic for the tip. Also, the envelope material of the Mark 7 was cupro-nickel up until about 1940 and post war was gilding metal. GMCS was only used during WW2 for ball bullets and then not always.

Regards
TonyE


#5

[quote=“TonyE”]Hi Joe

Welcome to the board.

These rounds are as Randy says, made by Kynoch. The Kirkee monogram was K^F, not K.

The idea of the aluminium tip to the Mark 7 bullet was to place the centre of gravity as far to the rear as possible to provide ballistic stability. The additional effect of a tumbling bullet was a result of this.

The use of aluminium was not to save costs, as aluminium is far more expensive than lead. When they wanted to save aluminium is both WW1 and WW2 they used a substitute material, usually paper fibre or ceramic for the tip. Also, the envelope material of the Mark 7 was cupro-nickel up until about 1940 and post war was gilding metal. GMCS was only used during WW2 for ball bullets and then not always.

Regards
TonyE[/quote]
thanks for the correction i realize now that i got my stories crossed, it wasnt 303 brit ammo i was talking about but 5.45x39 soviet and that ammo didnt have an alluminum tip, i did however in the mid 90’s buy som potugese made 303 ammo(fnm-72-5) that was as i described it above and i thought that most of it was of similar construction i further forgot that some of it was cupro-nickle, i guess you cant believe everything you here and only half of what you read, i figure if anyone would know what there talking about it would be someone from england where the 303 got it birth>> again thanks and god bless >> your friend joe


#6

Thanks and enjoy the board.

Regards
TonyE


#7

Thanks for the info guys Randy