30-06 & 30 Carbine Grenade Blanks


#1

I thought some of you might find these interesting. I am not sure why the two types were packed in the same Spam Can. The cartons were inside brown semi-waterproof wrappings with same info stamped on them as is found on the cartons. Both blanks are the rose-crimped type with “L C 4” headstamps.




#2

Ron - that is an interesting can and packaging system. I never have seen one of those before. A wild guess would be that the can’s contents are predicated on the TOE requirements of one basic unit - perhaps a company, 9although that seems like a lot of grenada blanks for a company), or a Batallion. The quantity of the blanks would tell me they were either for Infantry or Combat Engineers. Can’t think of any units that would have the need other than those. (I am basing this on issuance to the Army - if for the Marines or possibly the Navy Seebees, than I wouldn’t have a clue). I was in the Army not too long after Korea - Joined Octiber 18, 1956 as a Reseve and transferred to the regular Army coincidentally on October 18, 1957. Our unit was based on the 9-man infantry squad, and one man per squad had a grenade launcher for his personal weapon - usually the Squad Leader. That doesn’t mean he couldn’t pass it to someone else, usually whoever was the best “marksman” with grenades. I was in a weapons aquad (MG), and I don’t recall anyone having these. The small arms assortment was varied - gunners carried a pistol, assistant gunners a carbine, as I recall, and ammo carriers an M1 rifle. Don’t recall what the squad leader and asst. squad leaders carried. After basic training, I never fired another rifle grenade in the rest of my RA and Reserve time.


#3

These Small quantity Spam cans were special order containers made up as “Repacks” by Lake City Ammunition Plant for special uses, such as Airdrops to insurgent groups, use by CIA-funded groups, etc. Most commonly made up during the Vietnam War.
I have seen larger cans with packeted .30 cal AP and .30 cal Incendiary ammo, some recent manufacture (1960s), some WW II dates.

The complete seal system indicates Tropical area usage, or long term caching by Undercover or guerrilla groups.

As an aside, regular supplies by the OSS of .30 cal carbine launchers and cartridges was undertaken to Ho Chi Minh’s forces in northern Indochina in late 1944 (out of Kunming in China) in the war against the Japanese in what is now Vietnam. Sadly this co-operation fell flat in 1946 when the US turned its support to the french in re-occupying Vietnam with all the tragedy qwhich followed from 1946 to 1975.
The LC Spam can is the fruit of WW II and early tropical experiences with conserving ammo from the elements; it did assume you had a large can-opener.

An interesting Supply solution for special purposes. I don’t think the small unit (Regular US Army) quite explains this type of can. All “normal” US Units would be supplied by the usual “GI can” system ( .30 cal or .50 cal cans, suitably labelled, and “resealable”…the spam cans are a “Once opened, Must use all” type solution.

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics


#4

Doc–Thanks for all the historical info on this packing. I thought it was a little strange for regular army use. You mention needing a can opener. Actually, these came with a key attached to the outside like the old Spam cans in the supermarket before the advent of the “pop-top” can. You just twisted the key and pulled a 1/4 inch wide strip off all the way around the can to open it.


#5

Thanks, Ron, but most of the Spamcans I have seen had the riptab on the side, but no key…probably went missing along the way…in any case, any self-respecting guerrila has either a US GI can opener or a Swiss Army pocket knife…you never know when you come across “canned Goods”…

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics


#6

[quote=“DocAV”]Thanks, Ron, but most of the Spamcans I have seen had the riptab on the side, but no key…probably went missing along the way…in any case, any self-respecting guerrila has either a US GI can opener or a Swiss Army pocket knife…you never know when you come across “canned Goods”…

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics[/quote]

Those I met always used their bayonets. A Swiss army knife is pure luxury for irregular forces and even some regular ones would be more than glad to have such one.