30-06 Dummy


#1

I believe this 30-06 Dummy round was made for the British Home Guard can any one confirm this ?plus who made this Dummy ,was it made by FA ? the bullet is of an unknown white metal and is heavier than a normal loaded round , note that the flutes extend about 3/4 of the way down the case from the neck , Thanks Randy


#2

Randy

I don’t think it’s a dummy (drill) cartridge. I believe it’s a multi-ball. May be a misfire which accounts for the weight. Or a fired round that someone has put bullets back into.

Go to the home page. On the left side open “Introduction to 30-06”. Scroll down to “Multiball”.

Ray


#3

Hi Ray, Thanks for your reply, when I first got the round my first thought was a “Greener Dummy” round but the late date F A 27 had me stumped . regards Randy


#4

[quote=“randy”]I believe this 30-06 Dummy round was made for the British Home Guard can any one confirm this ?plus who made this Dummy ,was it made by FA ? the bullet is of an unknown white metal and is heavier than a normal loaded round , note that the flutes extend about 3/4 of the way down the case from the neck , Thanks Randy

[/quote]

Randy,

It doesn’t look like a multi-ball to me from here. The primer seems to have fired and to have been subjected to pressure, it looks like some cratering around the striker mark. A missfire would not hug the striker like that or crater around it. So (to me) it looks like it started out as a fired case which brings us back to your original theory of a British Home Guard dummy. The bullet may be a die-cast zinc based alloy. We did use complete die cast dummies and many dummies were made from fired cases. This could be yet one more variant, if so it is an uncommon one. An X-Ray would decide; multi-ball or dummy. If it is a multi-ball then I owe Ray another beer.

gravelbelly


#5

This is one of the many “Home Guard” dummies (Drill) made in the UK on fired US cases supplied as part of the Lend-Lease agreement during WW2. Many UK engineering companies were involved, who made dummies to rough specs in the thousands. Chris P.


#6

Were fired cases specifically supplied as part of the lend-lease program? I always assumed they were made on cases used in live fire training and collected up.


#7

Mr Gravelbelly,

What brand do you prefer? Warm or cold?


#8

Different countries use different fluting patterns. They were not concerned with any resemblence to an old american load in WWII in England, as they did not use the multi-ball load. Further, the flutes on the multiball load are shorter than those on the British drill round of the type shown.

I like the different flutes from different countries. I picked up a 7.9 round at St. Louis that was found in Germany and because of its headstamp, believed to be and sold as an “experimental” (there’s that over-used word again) 1930s German dummy. When I got it home, it was obvious from the flute pattern that it was an early East German (DDR) drill round, and had nothing to do with the third Reich, other than the headstamp. Like the .30-06 in question, a dummy made on “any old brass.”


#9

Sorry John, I deleted part of my post while you were typing yours. It makes it look like you are answering a question that nobody asked.

For everyone else, what I asked was, why would the UK re-work empty cases into drill rounds and use a flute pattern that was the same as was used on loaded rounds.

Ray


#10

Fired case were shipped over. Large numbers of the official British Mk I Drill, Mk II Drill and Mk IV can be found on fired US cases dating back to the 20s.

The flutes on this particular “expediency” drill round are from the shoulder and I know of no other offical 30-06 dummy/drill that had the flutes start from this position. Greener’s experiments were earlier and did use such flutes but, as John says, they were shorter. There are REM-UMC cases that also have these short flutes which were used in a multiball configuration. However, I have never seen anything definitive that identified them as being destined for Greener’s experiments or just a test of the concept done in the US.
Below a poor photo of some of the 30-06 Greener rounds in my old collection.

Chris P.


#11

Thanks for all the info Guys, it looks like I have an uncommon variation of a Home Guard Dummy . Randy


#12

Ray,

The flutes may also serve to centralise/lock the cast bullet in place. What usually causes any drill round or dummy to fail is the bullet coming loose and I see no special crimp. We don’t know what shape the “bullet” is inside the case but I suspect that it has a long tail bacause the round is heavier than a normal ball round.

As for beer, how about a cool pint of Morlands brewery “Old Speckled Hen” (also known as Spotty Chicken).

gravelbelly