30-06 Gallery


#1

I am assuming these are Re-loads and not original Gallery rounds.

Thanks Steve


#2

Steve

FA did furnish empty re-cycled cases for gallery re-loading but most all of them I have seen were dated from WW 1 and a few years after, and were mixed headstamps. Maybe Rene has some with later dates? Cases with an FA 27 headstamp would have been from the new Cal .30 M1 ammunition. By the early 1920s the Gallery Cartridge was redesignated as the Guard Cartridge.

You can probably tell if yours are re-loads by looking carefully at the primer to see if the crimp has been removed. The fool-proof way to tell is to pull one of the bullets in order to look at the inside of the case walls.

Either way, please catalog them as Cal .30, not .30-06 Gov’t.

Ray


#3

The latest box from Frankford Arsenal I have is lot nr 307 dated 1921. I know from pictures that lot #345 is also still 1921.
I haven’t seen any later boxes (of course that doesn’t mean anything).

The cartridges in this box are headstamped: RA H 18

I do not have any round-nosed cartridges dated later than 1921 but in CP 30-06 you can read that many cases were sent out
to be reloaded in the field and that dates up to 1936 can be encountered.

cheers
René


#4

Thanks Ray and Dutch, These are not mine Just helping out a new collector, He got these at a flea market…
Steve


#5

Commercial moulds for those bullets have been in production (Ideal, then Lyman) for almost 100 years. I have 2 in my collection. I once had a large gang mould that made (IIRC) 9 at a time. The bullets have also been made commercially. Also, “custom” or small-scale commercial reloading operations offered the gallery load in the 1920s & 30s. Alloy, bullet color & bullet lubricant might be a way to tell the US military-produced loads from others. I have 2 that I am sure are military production, WW1 headstamps. Those bullets are nearly black, covered with a wax lubricant.


#6

[quote][/quote]Either way, please catalog them as Cal .30, not .30-06 Gov’t.

Ray… I am new to collecting .30-06 can you explain why they should not be call .30-06…many thanks…paul.


#7

Timeout

It’s just a pet peeve of mine - calling cartridges by their correct nomenclature. I’m also a not picker. So, U.S. Military cartridges of the type shown are correctly called Cal .30. You won’t find a military box marked “30-06” which is strictly a commercial designation.

I know that some will argue that the 30-06 comes from the fact that they are 30 caliber and the original cartridge was the Model 1906, therefore 30-06. But, if that designation is correct then the Blank would be 30-09 and the first Tracer the 30-17, etc.

I make the same argument for all U.S. Military. The 7.62mm NATO is what that particular cartridge is called in the U.S. In GB it’s 7.62mm and in Europe it’s the 7.62x51mm. The commercial version here in the U.S. Is the .308 Winchester.

I am constantly taken to task for using correct nomenclature, especially by non-collectors and younger shooters. I’ve given in to a certain extent by calling the cartridge the Cal .30 (30-06).

Ray


#8

Thanks Ray I understand now as I have seen .30-06 on commercial rounds. Guess what… all my US .30 are marked up as .30-06, so I have to decide if to change them or to change any others I add to them. Nothing is easy! …paul.


#9

Thanks Ray I understand now as I have seen .30-06 on commercial rounds. Guess what… all my US .30 are marked up as .30-06, so I have to decide if to change them or to change any others I add to them. Nothing is easy! …paul.


#10

I feel the important thing is to KNOW that theses other names exist and that are describing the same cartridge and the difference is in their use. It has happened to me more than once, is to purchase a cartridge that I did not have, only to find out it was a common round but with a different designated name. In some cases it was done just to make it appear different and in others it was done to be correct. So continue to be a nit picker it is very helpful!!!