.30 Army "Reloaded and repacked at FA" box


#1

This box is mentioned in HWS vol.1 p.75 but no picture there. Is it so common that the picture is not needed? I was attracted to Sept.15, 1914 date and all that reloading info in the back. My box is beat up, maybe someone (Randy) can add a good image so I can see it in all its glory?


#2

Two “Repacked” boxes by Frankford Arsenal…





Randy


#3

Thank you, much impressed. Most of my cartridges have a crack at the mouth, is it a result of reloading or lack of annealing (or both)?


#4

Vlad…

The cracked necks are, for the most part, due to lack of annealing and 100 or more years of the “solid” bullet finally overcoming the thin case neck wall, resulting in the crack…

Randy


#5

P.S.

Your box is interesting in that where it states Lot 11 of 1914, it has been ink-stamped with a “12”…

Randy


#6

It’s interesting that, judging by the L & R notation [I’m assuming for “Laflin & Rand”], these cartridges were in fact “reloaded” with propellant that was a decade or more old when the reloading took place. Jack


#7

There was a discussion several years ago about a March 1916 dated bandoleer of reloaded Krag ammunition using "FA BLEND Nitroglycerine Powder."
http://iaaforum.org/forum3/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=9717&hilit=krag+bandoleer

I was wondering if any of Vlad’s cartridges had the line marked across the headstamp which frequently was sued to indicate reloaded ammo.


#8

I’VE NOT FOUND ANY OF THE CARTRIDGES RELOADED BY FRANKFORD ARSENAL AT THIS LATE DATE TO HAVE RELOAD STRIKES. IF ONE SHOULD BE ENCOUNTERED WITH A RELOAD STRIKE IT WOULD BE AN INDICATION TO ME THAT THE CARTRIDGE HAD BEEN RELOADED FOR A THIRD TIME. THESE CARTRIDGES ARE EASILY IDENTIFIED, EVEN IF REMOVED FROM THE ORIGINAL BOX, BY A DARK VIOLET OR PURPLE PRIMER SEAL.


#9

My box contains a variety of headstamps from 1900 to 1904, none have the reloading line across the headstamp (I read about it in HWS), the primer is purple. I’ll post imaging when I get home from work.


#10

Cal .30 (Krag) cartridges are notorious for cracked necks. They are found more often than not. I once had two full bandoleers of ammunition and every single cartridge had a neck crack.

Ray


#11

Here is a sample of headstamps from my box.
scan0073


#12

Is it not possible that “F.A. Blend, Nitroglycerine” powder is a euphemism for recycled Laflin and Rand? I’m thinking that “blend” means the propellant from the cases was dumped into a kettle, stirred, and then reloaded. Lord knows the army pinched its pennies in those days. Jack


#13

JACK HAS HIT THE NAIL ON THE HEAD AS TO WHAT, “F.A. BLEND NITROGLYCERINE” WAS. HE IS ALSO CORRECT WITH REGARD TO THE, “PENNY PINCHING.” THIS WAS THE RESULT OF BRIGADIER GERNERAL WILLIAM CROZIER, CHIEF OF ORDNANCE, U.S.A. FROM 22 NOVEMBER 1901-12 JULY 1918. CROZIER WENT FROM BEING A CAPTIAN IN 1901 TO BRIGADIER GENERAL. GUESS HOW MANY SENIOR OFFICERS THAT UPSET. THE WHOLE CROZIER STORY IS ONE OF BACK ROOM POLITICS, LET’S JUST SAY HE WAS A, “BEAN COUNTER EXTRAORDINAIRE.”