.30 caliber Browning MG blank ammo: Berlin Grunewald (pics)


#1

Located 1 foot deep using a metal detector. Ammo can was unopened but rusted through. Location within prior U.S. Zone of Berlin, area used for training by the U.S. Army Berlin Brigade 1948-1989.

340 Cartridges
Cal .30 Blank
M_1__9__
Linked
Lot LC_L_12140_

Headstamp LC 53

Two belts of 170 rounds each in a sealed can. Belts placed in opposite directions, requiring can to be turned to feed second link.

Questions:

  1. Anyone know why the links faced opposite one another?
  2. Anyone know what the can said on the line with M_1__9__?
  3. Anyone have a pic of a decent can like this one?

These pics were sent to me by a retired Berlin police officer who has built a website devoted to the Americans who served in Berlin during the Cold War. He rode alongside them patrolling the Berlin Wall. His work honors our Veterans of that period. He lives near the training grounds and finds casings and various other items, regularly.

Here’s his website, if you are interested. The guy’s dedication to our troops is pretty impressive.

http://www.berlin-brigade.de

Jim
BavarianM1Carbines.com


#2

My guess is that the belt direction was dictated by the rounded corners of the can, tp maximize the number of rounds which will fit in the smallest possible space.


#3

Re: Question #2

Linked cartridges appear to be standard M1909 blanks

[quote=“sleeplessnashadow”]Located 1 foot deep using a metal detector. Ammo can was unopened but rusted through. Location within prior U.S. Zone of Berlin, area used for training by the U.S. Army Berlin Brigade 1948-1989.

340 Cartridges
Cal .30 Blank
M_1__9__
Linked
Lot LC_L_12140_

Headstamp LC 53

Two belts of 170 rounds each in a sealed can. Belts placed in opposite directions, requiring can to be turned to feed second link.

Questions:

  1. Anyone know why the links faced opposite one another?
  2. Anyone know what the can said on the line with M_1__9__?
  3. Anyone have a pic of a decent can like this one?

These pics were sent to me by a retired Berlin police officer who has built a website devoted to the Americans who served in Berlin during the Cold War. He rode alongside them patrolling the Berlin Wall. His work honors our Veterans of that period. He lives near the training grounds and finds casings and various other items, regularly.

Here’s his website, if you are interested. The guy’s dedication to our troops is pretty impressive.

http://www.berlin-brigade.de

Jim
BavarianM1Carbines.com[/quote]


#4

It’s likely that these rounds were packed base-to-base simply because, that way, you could be sure of being able to use half the can no matter which way it was facing when you opened it. If they were all facing one way, you can bet your last nickel that at least half the time, the can would have been facing the wrong way when it was opened, and then you’d have to move the WHOLE thing to get it into firing position (Murphy’s Law).