30 Carbine LC 72 and 73


#1

I wonder if anyone knows the story of 30 Carbine ammunition headstamped LC 72 and 73?

This came in clips of 10 in bandoliers but the clips lack the usual adaptor to fit the clip to the lips of a magazine. The adaptor was issued seperately in a small pocket of the bandolier. The clip is a slightly smaller version of that issued with 5,56x45 and is marked ‘EL 8448480’;

This is quite a late date for 30 Carbine ammunition and I would guess that it was never delivered to its ultimate destination because a lot of it appears to have been sold off under the CMP a number of years ago.

Happy collecting, Peter


#2

somewhat off-topic: I use discarded 5,56 mm clips, squeezed slightly in a vise, to make “new” .30 carbine clips. they are quicker to load magazines from that doing it by hand and my UpLula doesn’t work with carbine mags :-)
Now, back to the real programmming:
Søren


#3

What is an “Uplala?”

John Moss


#4

John

The LULA loaders are one of the better units out there for loading magazines. Also works as a quick unloader. I have 3 and they are superior to any of the others in the inventory. A fine piece of kit. Here’s a video that helps explain:
youtube.com/watch?v=8nKy9Tiq5HM


#5

The use of a 10 round charger for the 30 Carbine has always seemed a bit strange to me. The original magazine was a 15 round one so each load is a clip and a half? Just doesn’t make sense.

I did a bit of poking around and found that ammunition was supplied loose until the introduction of the selective fire M2 with its 30 round magazine … makes more sense.

The correct nomenclature for the 30 Carbine charger is;

Clip, Cartridge, Carbine (10 round), T.1

It was approved for service on August 30th, 1945 which is long after the introduction of the basic Carbine.

Any ideas on the destination of the ‘LC 72 or 73’ ammunition?

Happy collecting, Peter


#6

Peter,

Perhaps the late date .30 Carbine ammunition was being made to supply the “Vietnamization” program by the U.S. durring the Vietnam conflict. I think the old stocks of M2 Carbines were often used by the South Vietnamese troops and were likely popular with the folks of smaller physical stature.

Dave


#7

[quote=“DaveE”]Peter,

Perhaps the late date .30 Carbine ammunition was being made to supply the “Vietnamization” program by the U.S. durring the Vietnam conflict. I think the old stocks of M2 Carbines were often used by the South Vietnamese troops and were likely popular with the folks of smaller physical stature.

Dave[/quote]

Dave,

You’re almost certainly right, the stuff was probably on the docks waiting shipment over the Pacific when the last helicopters left the roof of the Saigon Embassy and it was then put into storage before being sold off.

But why change such a well established design as the charger with the integral adaptor at that late stage?

Peter


#8

The advantage of issuing one adaptor per bandoleer of clipped cartridges would be a significant saving of space when thousands of bandoleers have to be packed and shipped. Jack


#9

[quote=“DaveE”]Peter,

I think the old stocks of M2 Carbines were often used by the South Vietnamese troops and were likely popular with the folks of smaller physical stature.

Dave[/quote]

Correct, and they were also issued to the allied Hmongs in Laos where they still used them in 1998 together with ammunition from the 1950’s.