.303 Brit "U15 VII" dummy

Is it normal for a dummy to have a blackened projectile?
scan0026

It does mention these on Tony Edwards site - https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/-303-inch/-303-inch-drill---other-local-pattern-expedient

Richard.

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Thank you Richard. I completely forgot that Remington used U as their code in 1915. I was mistaking the case for a South African one.

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Am I right in guessing that Remington’s “U” comes from “Rem-UMC” longer name? Or there is another reason?
Also, I have problems finding the above round (U15 VII blackened projo) in Tony’s website. May you help?

Sorry I was meaning the blackened WW1 US Drill round I just thought it may be the case blackening had worm off but yours is just too nice and clean to simply have worn off the case. I have found quite a fewe .303 with dark bullets just due to age and poor storage, I wonder if this is just a WW1 Drill round with a dirty bullet

Richard.

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I’ll clean it when I get home, but by memory it looks clean. I don’t even see this headstamp (U15 VII) in Tony’s website, in “Drill American WWI” section.

There would have been a number of headstamps used Vlad. A lot of these were made from reject cases, which is why you see all sorts of non-specific cases used. The necessities of war.

The WWI era US ones were tinned and I believe the WWII ones blackened. The only drill round that I have in my collection with a blackened bullet is a NZ pattern one, on which both the case and the bullet is blackened.

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Firstly:
I looked at the projectile. It is not dirty, it is blackened on purpose.
Secondly:
Another collector with greater experience than mine (that’s 99% of IAA) told me that Remington blackened dummy projectiles of many other calibres, it was their common practice.
Thirdly:
The same collector told me to remove the old Scotch tape, it may ruin the cartridge. I removed it, the cartridge was OK. The round came from an old and famous Pennsylvania collector Ben Michel (did not know him), who died last January. So the Scotch tape was dry and brittle.