.303 British BZ


#1

Here is a picture of .303 British fired case with headstamp K1941 BZ (B is looks like 8, but it’s really B). What type of incendiary bullet was loaded in this case? And why this headstamp didn’t include the number of the bullet model? May be this early B Mark VI?


#2

[quote=“treshkin”]Here is a picture of .303 British fired case with headstamp K1941 BZ (B is looks like 8, but it’s really B). What type of incendiary bullet was loaded in this case? And why this headstamp didn’t include the number of the bullet model? May be this early B Mark VI?

treshkin,

I see no primer crimp on this case and I am pretty sure that there should be one. Do you have the case or just the picture? Is the neck normal or does it have a rose/star crimp. The reason that I ask is that many cases intended for ball, A.P., Incendiary, tracer etc. ended up as blanks after failing inspection. The blanks did not have a primer crimp. Other than that it looks very like a Ball Mark 8 Z headstamp.

gravelbelly


#3

Thank for your answer,

I think this case was load with bullet, because blanks cartridges are very rare in our region. Yestarday I try to clean headstamps to get more readability headstamp. Case, case mouth and headstamp are in the picture.


#4

This is a Kynoch commercial pattern of the BIV Buckingham type incendiary originally designed for export pre WW2.

When Britain was in need of all and every type of ammo in 1940, the British military agree to accept the Kynoch pattern bullet which although similar to the BIV had internal differences (CN covered plug being the main one). The “step” in the bullet was in a different position and the ogive was slightly different. They were made in at least 1940 and 1941. There was a second version with a slightly different bullet headstamped “K39 VIIB”. The bullets were sometimes blue tipped.

Both types were taken into service as the “Incendiary, B Mark IV*”

I will post pictures of the examples in my collection later when I have more time.

Regards
TonyE


#5

[quote=“TonyE”]This is a Kynoch commercial pattern of the BIV Buckingham type incendiary originally designed for export pre WW2.

When Britain was in need of all and every type of ammo in 1940, the British military agree to accept the Kynoch pattern bullet which although similar to the BIV had internal differences (CN covered plug being the main one). The “step” in the bullet was in a different position and the ogive was slightly different. They were made in at least 1940 and 1941. There was a second version with a slightly different bullet headstamped “K39 VIIB”. The bullets were sometimes blue tipped.

Both types were taken into service as the “Incendiary, B Mark IV*”

I will post pictures of the examples in my collection later when I have more time.

Regards
TonyE[/quote]

Thank you very much!


#6

Here are the pictures of the British BIV trade pattern incendiaries as promised.

Left is a 1940 dated example of the round you have which is a B Mark IVz, centre is the other type, a cordite loaded B Mark IV, and right is a normal B Mark IV. Note the slight variation in ogive and position of the bullet shoulder.

Headstamps are written on the cases but are:

This is the 1940 Kynoch drawing showing the CN covered fluted plug.

The following is the entry in the British military “Regulations for Army Ordnance Services, Part 7, Pamphlet No. 11, Small Arms Ammunition” which shows the B Mark IV*z designation for trade pattern incendiaries.

Regards
TonyE


#7

Very nice.


#8

It could NOT be a Mark 8 for the simple reason that the use of the Indo-Arabic font for Mark numbers was only introduced in late 1944 (ie, the Roman numbers were replaced by “normal” numbers.)
Secondly ( and correctly) the Kynock Export headstamps were slightly different from that required by the “List of Changes” of the British War Office

Good collection of Kynoch Export cartridges…a little researched area of collecting.

regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics


#9

TonyE,

Thank you, great info for me.