.303 British - odd Dominion 1918 blank(?)


#1

I recently acquired the below specimen. There is nothing about it in Labbett (at least so far as I can determine). The headstamp is 'D A {broad arrow in C} 19 18 VII . . . I would expect a blank made from brass culled from normal Mk VII ball ammunition production. What is puzzling for me is the fabric seen here, tightly enclosed in the rose crimp. Was this some sort of special loading, or simply some variation of a standard blank unique to Dominion of Canada?

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#2

BTT


#3

BTT


#4

Just a shot in the dark, but could someone have stuffed the piece of cloth in to prevent powder from coming out due to a misaligned card wad. Does it appear to have been crimped in place. If it does, perhaps its part of the crimper-operator’s shirt???


#5

I don’t collect this stuff but I have two with different hs,both WWI era.
It is not fabric but cotton batting,I think it was in place of a cardboard wad. Dick.


#6

[quote=“Iconoclast”]I recently acquired the below specimen. There is nothing about it in Labbett (at least so far as I can determine). The headstamp is 'D A {broad arrow in C} 19 18 VII . . . I would expect a blank made from brass culled from normal Mk VII ball ammunition production. What is puzzling for me is the fabric seen here, tightly enclosed in the rose crimp. Was this some sort of special loading, or simply some variation of a standard blank unique to Dominion of Canada?

.[/quote]

Getting blanks to work without hurting your friends was always a tricky operation. The card wad was always a problem at short range so perhaps this is a softer form of wadding intended to lose energy quicker.

gravelbelly


#7

This is what is seen here; I used the term “fabric” as a generic - and imprecisely.

Thank you very much for your replies; they reinforce my own surmise. I was hoping someone might be able to advise if this was the Mk whatever or the Mk whatever Alternate - some sort of official nomenclature / identification. It sounds as though it is strictly a Canadian design (?).

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#8

Blanks in 303 caliber with a fiber wad in the rose crimp predate the Great War Canadian version by a good while, it appears. I have a similar blank with the single word MAXIM at 12 o’clock, thus similar to the Maxim-marked Cordite mk. II, which has the additional 1895 date at 6 o’clock. The material in my blank is darker and rougher than cotton, appearing more like a felt pellet. Labbett and Mead is good for British and pre-1947 Indian 303 loadings, but Australian, Canadian, and New Zealand variants are basically absent, so not finding the Canadian loading described there doesn’t mean it lacked official sanction.


#9

Thank you for the response and welcome to the site!

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