.303 Drill


#1

Many of you will be familiar with the experimental Kynoch drill rounds, similar to the D Mark VI, that are simply headstamped with a “K”. There are two versions of this, one with the K at 12 o’clock and the other at 6 o’clock. There is no discernable difference in the rounds. (1st and 2nd in the picture)

I also have a similar round (“K” at 6 o’clock) where the bullet is seated too far out. There is no neck crimp on this round, presumably because the cannelure is in the wong place and it appears totally original. (3rd in picture)

I have now acquired the round on the right. It also has the “K” at 6 o’clock but has a spring loaded point to the bullet. The point can be pushed in until it is level with the top of the bullet proper.

I am now wondering if these were produced either to test feed mechanisms or to cause jams for machine gun training. It seems strange that there should be two (at least) odd versions of this drill round.

Remember that in WWI there were special “Purple Label” .303 rounds made 0.1 inches shorter than normal to produce No.1 stoppages in Vickers guns for pilot training. Admittedly these were live rounds not drill, but…

Any thoughts anyone?

Regards
TonyE


#2

[quote=“TonyE”]Many of you will be familiar with the experimental Kynoch drill rounds, similar to the D Mark VI, that are simply headstamped with a “K”. There are two versions of this, one with the K at 12 o’clock and the other at 6 o’clock. There is no discernable difference in the rounds. (1st and 2nd in the picture)

I have now acquired the round on the right. It also has the “K” at 6 o’clock but has a spring loaded point to the bullet. The point can be pushed in until it is level with the top of the bullet proper.

[/quote]

TonyE,

You say that “There is no discernable difference in the rounds”, but the impressed flutes look a slightly different shape, or is it my eyes and the beer? These turn up frequently as “new” empty cases too, with both headstamp arrangements. I have also seen complete drill rounds made by inserting a modern .308" bullet into these cases.

Regarding the spring loaded point one, do you think that the point originally came out far enough to form a normal bullet profile and length and has since jammed down?

gravelbelly