.303 from the Netherlands


#1

I have 2 cartridges I believe they are from the Netherlands both manufactured by Artillerie Inrichtingen, Hamburg, Netherlands

1st round has a cupro nickle bullet with a very sharp pointed profile, it is very magnetic and a black primer annulus ring

headstamp D

Am I correct in my thinking that the headstamp is
30 @ 12 oclock - date of case manufacture
30 @ 3 oclock - date of filling
D - Dordreicht plant
13 - lot number

2nd round as a GM bullet also very sharp pointed profile, magnetic but not as strong as the first and only slightly at the bullet tip, this has a Purple primer annulus ring

headstamp G

am I correct with the 38,39 & 26 being same a 1st round, what does the G stand for and what is the L stamped between the 38 & 39

please forgive my amature headstamp drawings, I cant get my camera to work at the moment.

hope someone can help

all the best
Richard.


ID of a .303 British
Help with .303 headstamp identification
#2

Dots on the i please: location of AI was Zaandam-Hembrug.


#3

I’m wondering if they aren’t in fact the 7.9 m/m rimmed cartridge for machine gun use. Jack


#4

Jack - do you mean the 7.92 x 57R Dutch schere Patrone 23, that is the only 7.9mm rimmed cartridge I can find and the dimensions dont match mine and the only photo I found has an extractor groove even though its a rimmed cartridge where my 2 have no extractor groove and are a perfect match to British .303 dimensions.

duqjans - please forgive me but I dont understand your comment “Dots on the i please” and are you telling me that I have the wrong manufacturer.

thank you for you reply’s gents
Richard.


#5

“Dots on the i please” is a Dutch expression which means you should be more accurate.
The place where the Artillerie Inrichtingen was situated is Hembrug, not Hamburg. The correct spelling of the other city is Dordrecht, not Dordreicht.
(To make things more confusing: Inhabitants of Dordrecht call the city ‘Dordt’. That is why some ammo packages from the “N.V. Nederlandsche Patronen-, Slaghoedjes- en Metaalwarenfabriek” have the word ‘Dordt’ instead of Dordrecht printed on it.)
We do understand that Dutch is a very difficult language for non-Dutchies!

Both cartridges look very Dutch to me. Especially the second one with the “L” is probably Dutch. ‘L’ means Lichtspoor, or Tracer.
Cartridges in .303 with this headstamp configuration were made for the Dutch Navy. However the headstamps shown are not familiar to me.
The ammunition plant in Dordrecht stopped production in October 1936, so the second cartridge can hardly be from Dordrecht.
Dordt did produce tracer rounds for the Dutch Navy, but that was in 1931, and these cartridges had the ‘L’ in the headstamp combines with a red annulus primer ring.


#6

Many thanks for the info, I will amend my spelling mistakes. I got the information from the internet and was unsure hence me asking on here. It is always good ask the experts.

I am a little unsure now if they are .303 or 7.92 rimmed, I will pull the rounds and do some accurate measurments, they were sold to me as .303 at Bisley but I cant remember who I bought them from

thanks again
Richard.


#7

Would they both be .303 then they are very rare.
But a 7.92 x 57R tracer in good condition is also rare! Please, don’t pull it!!! My heart is still beating and I want it to keep it this way :))


#8

Looks like they are 7.92 I have managed to measure them and they are the correct case lenght for the 7.92 :-(
oh well not for me then.

The tracer has a small dent in the case but other than that it is mint condition and the other round is in excellent condition too

Richard.


#9

Quickest way to distinguish the two cartridges is diameter of the case just forward of the rim. The .303 will run .452 in. or so, while the 7.9 is about .467 in., or about .35 mm larger. No need to pull bullets. Jack


#10

Never thought of that Jack cheers and yes they are 7.9 oh well gutted but sure someone will find a new home for them

thanks again gents, we learn something new every day

Rich.