.303 Jeffery rimless

Does anyone have any examples of this cartridge they are able to post a photo of?

It was apparently a short-lived pre WW1 match rifle round made from a necked down .333 Jeffery case.

Thanks for any replies.

From the 1965 “Cartridges of the World”, Chapter 6, British Sporting Cartridges, page 216:

I found this on the Imperial War Museum web site, but I failed to mark their web link:

Description: an example of a commercial target cartridge box by Kynoch. The .303 Magnum cartridge exists in rimless and semi-rimmed forms. It was introduced as a proprietary target cartridge for long range Match Rifle shooting by W.J. Jeffery, c. 1919 and appears to have become obsolete c. 1932. The case is based on the experimental .276 developed for the British P13 rifle. Performance is very similar to the US .30-06 round.

1) printed on top of label 2) printed on sides of label 3) printed on base

  1. 10 KYNOCH 10 // 1925 (in red) .303 MAGNUM 1925 (in red) // CARTRIDGES // “NOBELOY” (REGISTERED) // NON-FOULING BULLETS // THESE BULLETS SHOULD NOT BE GREASED (in red) // MANUFACTURED AT THE KYNOCH FACTORIES // OF // NOBEL INDUSTRIES LIMITED 2) Kynoch trade mark .303 MAGNUM 10 // CARTRIDGES // “NOBELOY” BULLETS 3) Nobel trade mark

This article about the .303 Magnum does not [?] mention Jeffrey… this is the only place I found that had a photo:
http://www.cartridgecollector.net/303-magnum-rimless

semi-rimmed top rimess below & typical (empty) semi-rimmed box. Headstamp is the same as the one on Dann’s site. A very uncommon variation. edited to add, the green wax is original. Again edited to refer to a below post to correct the rounds in this photo

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Jack & Pete, he means the scarce .303 cartridge made by Kynoch from a necked up .280 Jeffery rimless case -not a .333-. Known examples are unheadstamped.

Regards,

Fede

Only thing I have that somewhat fits the bill is the Kings Norton 420/303 which is also unheadstamped
Does this have a proper name & is it referenced anywhere?

Pete, yes, it is also called “.420/.303”. Basic references are Datig 1 p. 107, Hoyem Vol. 3 p. 144, and Fleming p. 30-31.

Regards,

Fede

Thanks Fede & here you go Falcon
it is also listed in Hardings, Birmingham Cartridges Makers page 245
Here are the two the 420/303 lower & the 420/.276 & the heads. Which are by Kings Norton.
420 heads


We have a 420/276 in our latest sale see lot number 427.

So to correct my above post with the .303 Magnum box which I show two semi-rimmed & not the rimless as I had grabbed the right headstamp but the wrong case. As the rimless headstamp is found on both the rimless and the semi-rimmed, here are both.
303 mag heads

Is not the .303 Magnum/Jeffrey what the three references I gave indicate?
I saw nothing about a “.333” cartridge…

The .303 magnum is a different case type much more tapered than the .420/303 & so an entirely different animal


303 magnum on top, semi-rimmed & rimless & the 420 303 & 276 below, Those are very close to the .333 Jeffery rimless (not shown) or .280/.333 Jeffery rimless (also not shown), The shoulder shape being the most visible plus the lack of headstamp between the two 333 Jeffery variations & the 420 Kings Norton variations

Thanks for the replies.

From Pete’s photo, the cartridge I have is the .420 / 303. Unfortunately it has a hole drilled in the case. Am I correct to assume from the posts that this calibre has nothing to do with Jeffery?

There is no headstamp, and the base of the bullet is marked KN. The primer cap is brass and rounded.

Nice find, hole or not.

I can’t say for sure if there was any tie to Jeffery’s or not. But the case is very, very, similar to the .333 rimless.
AND Jefferies did work with KN or vice-versa see the article in IAA issue 498 pg. 38 we did on the front half-blackened cases.

With the KN on the bullet base I’d say that makes it KN but the similarities of the case to the .333??? No answer to the why of that.

The head should appear the same as those I show. Slightly flattened domed primer and ring crimped.

The head and primer are exactly like the one shown in your photo. The primer on my round has been snapped by something other than a firing pin.

The shoulder is also slightly deformed where someone tried to remove the bullet by bending it to one side.

DIY inerted rounds in common calibres are often seen in the UK where many people have an ingrained fear of guns and ammunition.