303 rc


#1

I found this round 303

the headstamp is RC 1942 VII = Raleigh Cycle Co. Ltd - Nottingham - UK
the identification is correct?

thanks!


#2

I have never seen an RC headstamp like that, but RG with the identical format is a vvery common round and comes from Radway Green. I suspect this is the latter, struck with a broken bunter with the horizontal line of the "G: missing.
JMHO.


#3

I agree John, definitely “RG 1942 VII” You can see the upward stroke on the tail of the “G”.

Regards
TonyE


#4

[quote=“JohnMoss”]… I suspect this is the latter, struck with a broken bunter with the horizontal line of the "G: missing.
JMHO.[/quote]

You can of course!

this is a greatly enlarged detail

this is a comparison with RG 1942 VII

very different font

yet the diameter of the base the RG is 0,524" (13,34 mm) and “RC” is 0,535" (13,60 mm) is the large base whom I have ever seen…

I think that they were built by two very different machines


#5

Could well have been from two different lines. British rounds from the war often exhibit different headstamp fonts saying the same thing. If you would like an exercise that will probably explode your brain - it just about did mine - make a study of British WWII headstamps from HN found on 9 mm Para rounds.
Diverent fonts, different punctuation, etc ad nauseum. It may have actually been purposeful and with meaning (identification of loading or manufacturing lines???). At any rate, there are so many that it rivals even the champion of minor headstamp variations, the Evanville Chrysler .45 ammo from WWII.

I will stand by my identification that your cartridge is from Radway Green.


#6

not even if they pay me… !!!

perhaps it would be simpler to know if the Raleigh Cycle Co. Ltd - UK has built the 303 rounds

I apologize for my English

Carlo


#7

I collecterd .303 for some years and built a fair collection of them. I also have many books on the subject. I have never seen or heard of any .303 British caliber round with an “RC” headstamp.

Perhaps some of our British members could get in on this.


#8

Here are three variations of that headstamp. Think the one on the right is close to yours but without a bunter malfunction.

As John says there is almost no end to minor variations in some British case type headstamps. I think I found about 30-40 different 9mm’s by HN before I said this is just nuts & stopped. This is also true with .303’s.

Hope this is of help.


#9

norby973, the British like the Americans preferred to set up relatively few big ordnance factories for small arms ammunition. This was contrary to the German practice of scattering a larger number of relatively small factories all over the country and often adding ammunition lines to otherwise civilian factories.
That makes it extremely unlikely for a case making line being set up at a British cycle manufacturer.


#10

JPeelen: In the first war, if not the second, a British cycle manufacturer, Rudge Whitworth, did produce 303 cartridge cases. Jack


#11

Quotes from “.303 INCH” by P Labbett and PJF Mead:-

RALEIGH CYCLE CO. LTD.

This company, although having no previous ammunition manufacturing experience, was put into ammunition production by the Government as part of the 1939-45 war emergency expansion plan. The company did not make .303 inch ammunition but only 20mm calibre, using the headstamp codes “RC” and RH".

RUDGE WHITWORTH LTD.

This company represented the only new commercial ammunition manufacturer put into business by the Government as a result of demand in the 1914-18 war. Apart from their other existing interests however, Rudge Whitworth were connected with the cartridge machinery firm of Taylor and Challen and and were therefore considered as having experience suitable for ammunition manufacture. They received their first Government contract for the supply of .303 inch Mark 7 ball ammunition in 1915 and continued to produce this until the end of 1918 at their new factory in Tysley. They used the headstamp code letters “RW”.

gravelbelly


#12

[quote=“gravelbelly”]…RALEIGH CYCLE CO. LTD.

This company, although having no previous ammunition manufacturing experience, was put into ammunition production by the Government as part of the 1939-45 war emergency expansion plan. The company did not make .303 inch ammunition but only 20mm calibre, using the headstamp codes “RC” and RH"…[/quote]

issue resolved
is a broken bunter…

thanks to all

Carlo


#13

Further to my post above, Rudge Whitworth used a headstamp with the letters R and W separated by the date, for example “R16W VII” on .303" Mark VII ball in 1916.

They also made chargers for .303" ammunition, typically marked: “R III” on Mark III chargers.

gravelbelly


#14

Further to the above, Rudge Whitworth used both “R18W” and “RW18”, I have both.

Regards
TonyE