303 Sav. cord wrapped

I have had this round in my collection for many years W.R.A.Co. 303 SAV. a fairly common round , mine is labelled CORD WRAPPED I am familiar with the WIRE WRAPPED projectiles but can’t find any info on CORD wrapped ones , the projectile is round nose lead , and there is something wrapped around it extending about 1/4in out of the case and into the neck, unfortunately it has a coat of old lacquer on it and it’s hard to see, can any one give me any info on Cord Wrapped. Thanks Randy

Randy

There was a thread on the Forum not long ago. Do a search. It was concerning wire patched bullets. I may have even started it, I don’t remember.

Anyway, the wire patched bullets were made with differing wrappings. Some of the very earliest ones were wound with a cotton or other fabric cord. They weren’t too strong and were soon discarded in favor of wire.

There are many wire patched examples using a cotton covered wire - what used to be called bell wire. That may be what you have. If it’s been lacquered it would be difficult to tell exactly what the wrapping is.

Ray

Hi Ray, I found the thread thanks , I do have a couple of the wire wrapped rounds and they do look a little different from the one in question, do you know if they were manufactured by the same company?, the only old add I can find is from the “National Projectile Works” in Grand Rapids, Michigan ,and they only mention “Wire Patched” I was hoping to get something more specific on CORD wrapped bullets, thanks Randy

Randy

The only reference I can find that ties the cord wrapped bullets to a specific manufacturer is Phil Sharpe’s Complete Guide To Handloading.

His narrative is a little confusing. The designer of the wire patched bullet was Mr. M.C. Lisle and he also helped found the National Projectile Works. Sharpe includes a quote from Elmer Kieth, who worked for Lisle, which says, in part, “. . . the Lisle Wire Patched Bullet, as it was originally known before adoption of the “National” name, was originally cast and wound with a very strong cotton or other fabric. . .”

So, I’d assume that the cord wrapped bullets were a product of National Projectile Works.

If you can locate Sharpe’s book the bullets are covered on p 111of the original text and pages 57 - 61 of the Supplement.

Ray

Ray, Thank you very much for that info and your research, I am sure I will be able to borrow a copy of Phils book from someone at the Gun Club and copy the bits I need. Randy