.35 Remington stripper clips


#1

I have a facsimile copy of the Alfa catalogue of arms and the outdoor, dated 1911. I have found this clip for .35 Remington cartridges to be used in a Browning semiautomatic rifle.

My question is: were these chargers specifically made for the Browning rifle, or were they for some military bolt action rifle? The clip seems to have approximately the dimensions of the 1893 Mauser clip, but it has only one lug on each side.


#2

I cannot speak for the FN-made clips for their version of the Browning Semi-automatic rifle. However, the clips for the Remington Models 8 and 81, which were the American versions of the same rifle, took clips made by Remington (or perhaps subcontracted out, I don’t really know which) that were unique to these rifles. There were three types of clips, each available in two forms - one for .25, .30 and .32 Remington caliber rifles, and one that worked with either .300 Savage or .35 Remington caliber ammunition. Those are the five calibers the Remington rifles were made in. Two of the forms are brass, while the third is a very flat steel stripper clip. They cannot be mistaken for other clips, since all are caliber marked on the bottom. Early catalogs indicated that each rifle came with three clips. In 1906, these clips were ten cents each. Instruction manuals from the early years of the rifles showed the clips as part number G298, with no differentiation for calibers. You specified that with your order, at a price of 20 cents each. By 1951, the clips were 95 cents each, and were differentiated by part number for the two caliber types - Part number 490 for the clips for .300 Savage and .35 Remington, and part number 495 for those that held the .25, .30 and .32 Remington cartridges.

One of the production types was brass with three bumps on the side, the center bump being lower on the clip’s side than the other two - they were not in a straight line like a 98 Mauser stripper. The second type had one single bump and is similar in appearance to that in the FN drawing, although not identical. It, too, was brass. The final style was steel and very flat, with a single bump on the sides. In each case the clips for .25, .30 and .32 had a shorter bump than did those for the .300 Svage/.35 Remington.

The two brass types were grooved on the bottom, with the two outer grooves running the full length of the charger, while the center groove stopped on each end well short of the edge of the charger. The caliber was stamped at one end of the center groove. The bottom of the last charger was flat and had only two square cut-outs for attachment of the spring.

Hope this is of some interest. All information is from the book “The 8 and the 81, A History of Remington’s Pioneer Autoloading Rifles,” by John Henwood, Revised second edition, pages 111-115.

John Moss


#3

Of course it is, thank you very much.


#4

As far as I know, the chargers for the Browning were unique to the rifle. The single sidewall lug is necessary because of the extra depth of the self-loaders receiver.

The 3 lug charger for the Remington is interesting because it is meant for use with the Remington Model 30 bolt action rifle as well as the Model 8/ 81 self-loaders. This is the reason for the staggered lugs as the larger central one works with the deep receiver of the Model 8/ 81 whilst the outer lugs engage with the charger loading slot on the smaller receiver of the Model 30. The part number for the 3 lug type was No. 538.

These chargers might have only cost 10 cents a pop but at the moment they sell for $30 to $40 each if in good condition. This active market speaks volumes for the number of rifles still in use as well as the difficulty of loading them without the correct charger.

Happy collecting, Peter


#5

Interesting stuff, Peter. Thank you.


#6

Here’s one of the Remington Model 8/81 stripper clips that John discussed, this one marked for use with the .35 Remington and .300 Savage cartridges.


#7

Guy - the nickeled clip you pictured must be the FN clip, as it is not one of the Remingtons. That’s great, as with it, and the other pictures posted, all basic styles except the most common - the flat steel clip - are pictured. It appears that a complete collection of these clips would number seven specimens - the FN, and all three Remington basic variations, each in the two differing lengths of bumps on the sides, for the two caliber rangers. You guys made this a nice thread. I didn’t have any of the clips on hand to picture. I have only had one of the brass .35s go through my hands ever, and don’t recall even knowing about the FN type. I have had several each of the flat steel clips over the years, which is what I based my comment of being the most common on. I don’t collect them, so they are passed on to folks who enjoy them when I find them.

John Moss


#8

Hey John

I really enjoy $100 bills :-)


#9

Rick - my friend, if I had any to spare, I would send you one. I am NOT being facitious.
Unfortunately, you picked the wrong friend - retired gun store clerks, even if they were “Managers” generally aren’t rich folk.

John Moss


#10

Not to worry John, some of my worst friends are rich. I’ll take a poor real friend any day.


#11

Ouch! I’d hoped to buy a .25/.30/.32 clip to fill with 6.8 SPC rounds for a display, but that’s FAR more than I’m willing to pay.

Oh, well…


#12

Ouch! I’d hoped to buy a .25/.30/.32 clip to fill with 6.8 SPC rounds for a display, but that’s FAR more than I’m willing to pay.

Oh, well…[/quote]

The Remington self-loaders still seem to be very popular despite the many years that have passed since they were last made. The reason the clips are needed is that the rifle has to be loaded through the top and it’s a tricky business doing this with loose rounds. There’s always the danger that you’ll forget to hold the bolt open or let it go by accident which will see fingers trapped by the bolt shooting forward. I’m told that the spring is a very powerful one.

I’ve no proof but I think the steel bodied chargers are of later production that the brass ones. Speaking for myself, they’ve always been hard to find. This is the only one I’ve had, has anyone seen one like this marked for 300/35 calibre?

Happy collecting, Peter


#13

Peter - you are correct. The steel clip is the last one made. They are thought to have been made perhaps during, and after, WWII. They do exist marked for the .35 & .300 Sav. calibers (both on the same clips, of course), and are so marked on one end, not towards the middle like the ones for the .25, 30 & .32 caliber.

Interesting how much they bring these days. I guess I should have kept the ones I gave away! : )

John Moss


#14

John,

I went searching through my notebooks because I was certain I had the date of introduction for the steel Remington chargers. According to the Collectors Grade book on the Model 8/ 81 rifles they were produced from 1940. I wonder if this was related to costs or to restrictions on the use of brass as a strategic material?

I have one brass charger marked ‘.35 Cal’ and one marked ‘.35 Cal .300 Savage’ which is interesting because I don’t believe that .300 Savage was introduced in the rifles UNTIL 1940 for the Model 81. In the light of steel being used for clips from 1940 does anyone know if this is correct?

The Model 30 was produced in 30-06, 7x57, 35 Remington and 257 Roberts which would all fit the 3 lug charger shown above. It was also made in 25, 30 and 32 Remington which would need a slightly smaller version of the same charger. I wonder if anyone has seen one of these?

Happy collecting. Peter


#15

Is there a clip which is marked only for the .35 caliber? The .300 appeared late in the day for the 8/81, so there would have been many clips intended at the time of manufacture only for the .35. The FN clips needn’t have been marked at all, as the firm produced the rifle only in .35 (equivalent) caliber. As for the necessity of using the clip, this arm is mean to load with or without the clip. Jack


#16

Enfield - you are spot on. Evidently, the clips you mention are from prior to 1940 for the one marked .35 only, and from 1941 on until they did the steel clips, the ones marked .35 and .300 Savage.

John Moss


#17

[quote=“JohnMoss”]Enfield - you are spot on. Evidently, the clips you mention are from prior to 1940 for the one marked .35 only, and from 1941 on until they did the steel clips, the ones marked .35 and .300 Savage. I am surprised the Collector’s Publication edition of the book by Henwood says the steel clips were made so early. His earlier editions say they were made late during the war years (which for us, was 1941 to 1945, but the :".35 - 300 Sav." marked brass clips would indicate to me that the steel clips were made probably after 1942. I shouldn’t guess on this stuff, since I don’t collect it, but logically, if the brass clip exists marked with and without the .300 Savage designation, it would have to have existed before and after 1941. I doubt both types were made simultaneously. I don’t have the last edition of the book from Collector Grade Publications. Wish I did. Did it make the production date identification as a positive statement, or as a general time period? Just wondered.

John Moss[/quote]


#18

There is indeed a clip marked for 0,35" only. Albeit that it’ll work just as well with 300 Savage of course.

Happy collecting


#19

[quote=“JohnMoss”][quote=“JohnMoss”]Enfield - you are spot on. Evidently, the clips you mention are from prior to 1940 for the one marked .35 only, and from 1941 on until they did the steel clips, the ones marked .35 and .300 Savage. I am surprised the Collector’s Publication edition of the book by Henwood says the steel clips were made so early. His earlier editions say they were made late during the war years (which for us, was 1941 to 1945, but the :".35 - 300 Sav." marked brass clips would indicate to me that the steel clips were made probably after 1942. I shouldn’t guess on this stuff, since I don’t collect it, but logically, if the brass clip exists marked with and without the .300 Savage designation, it would have to have existed before and after 1941. I doubt both types were made simultaneously. I don’t have the last edition of the book from Collector Grade Publications. Wish I did. Did it make the production date identification as a positive statement, or as a general time period? Just wondered.

John Moss[/quote][/quote]

I don’t own the Collector Grade book, here in the UK the price was a bit too high to buy it for the clip pages alone. I cribbed the details in a bookshop, I’m afraid to say.

At this distance in time I can’t remember how definite the assertion was about the date but my notebook says; “steel clip introduced in 1940”. Which is probably pretty close to what appears in the book. Maybe someone has a recent edition on their shelves and can help us out?

The other thing to remember is that these were probably made in volume and stocked for years from each order, wherever they were made. Especially in wartime it is unlikely that clips would be scrapped just because a new calibre had been introduced. As clips were issued with each rifle and spare clips were ordered by part number PLUS the calibre it seems possible to me that both types could have been in stock at the same time. Someone with a rifle in 0,35" Remington wouldn’t be too bothered if his clips didn’t mention 0,300 Savage as well.

Happy collecting, Peter


#20

Peter: Thanks for the pic of the clip marked for the .35 cal. only. Jack