357 mag "onslaught" I.D. help


#1

A while back I had purchased a small lot of 38/357 ammo, and one of the cartridges was listed as being an “onslaught” load. I had never heard of it, and the seller didn’t really even know what it was either. The headstamp reads “Midway 357 mag” and the projectile appears to be a non-ferrous sintered metal of some sort. It is not attracted to a magnet. I assume it is a self-defense load of some kind. Any ideas? (by the way, any suggestions on how to clean up the case to make the old label mark disappear without actually polishing the whole case?)


#2

DK–The “Bullet” for the “Onslaught” round consists of 5 flat lead discs. I have a picture of a disassembled round someplace. I’ll post it if I find it.


#3

I think that you won’t be able to erase the label mark from your case because there the brass is only less oxyded than the rest of the case not dirty for the label glue.You can polish the whole case and then leave it on the open air for some days,to resume its “old cartridge” look

Pivi


#4

Thanks for the info!


#5

[quote=“Pivi”]I think that you won’t be able to erase the label mark from your case because there the brass is only less oxyded than the rest of the case not dirty for the label glue.You can polish the whole case and then leave it on the open air for some days,to resume its “old cartridge” look

Pivi[/quote]
When I collected cartridges when I was a kid I polished alot of stuff, which I now regret doing. You can never get the original patina back once polished.


#6

I have heard of a patina restorer used on some coins called “deller’s darkenner” which helped to darker the shine on cleaned pennies. I’ll give it a try sometime on a worthless new casing.


#7

Many hobby shops and most businesses who do bronze castings will sell you “Brass Oxidizer”. While it’s used primarily to color bronze castings you can dilute it enough and immerse cartridges in it for a short time which does restore the patina to some extent. I use Brass Oxidizer #2 but you need to talk to the proprieter to make sure which particular one will give a brown color (as opposed to black or other colors).

I’ve also found that some gun bluing formulas will do the same thing. Birchwood Casey is one that I use. It contains Selenium Dioxide which I believe is the active ingrediant in most brass and bronze oxidizers.

I have patinaized cartridges by boiling them in a solution of water and Cascade dishwasher crystals, rinsing, and then setting them out in the relentless Arizona sun for several hours.

Don’t polish the cartridge with anything that is oil or grease based. You’ll play hell getting it clean enough to take on any color, even natural patina.

If you live in Kalifornia you’ll find that all of this stuff is harmful to laboratory animals. :) :)

Ray


#8

There’s nothing like sweat for this purpose.I suggest you to polish a worthless case and then manipulate it with your hands.
There are some suggestions to re create the old patina somewhere in the IAA web site


#9

Why not just let it grow old on its own again, instead of applying a lot of artificial measures? JMHO.


#10

[quote]Why not just let it grow old on its own again, instead of applying a lot of artificial measures? JMHO.[/quote] A good point, it would probably look honest again in about 3 years after carrying in my pocket on & off, and it’s not so valuable or fragile to not do such a thing.


#11

The last rounds I would fool with trying to artificially age them are valuable and fragile ones, or any scarce cartridge. Outer corrosion eating at the cartridge is, of course, a different matter. In the case of this modern, commercial cartridge, I would simply clean the sticky residue from the label off, if it is still on there, and put it in my collection and enjoy it. I can’t see how the mark from the label changes the characteristics of the cartridge, or the fact that one now has a specimen of that load, whatever the cartridge, in his collection. Especially since the cartridge in question appears to be in perfectly nice condition. Again, JMHO. Each to his own.