37x145mmR "37mm Mark III A2 Lot 6574-5 C.B.& C. Co.1941"

I think it is a training round for 37mm Airacobra nose gun. But Municion.org shows nothing under “37x145R”. It can’t be rare, can it?

DSCF8163 DSCF8164

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Definately rare in Europe!
In particular the steel case.

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Alex,
These Airacobras were brought to the USSR in huge numbers, and surely ammo came with them too. So how come these rounds are rare?

Vlad, the USSR is far away from here. :)
Also there were not that many P-39.
And the few locations these were deployed at did not make up for a noteworthy distribution.
Also I have never seen steel cases from Russia and also no dummies.
All that I ever saw from there was heavily dented, extremely corroded or simply blown to pieces.

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The Drill-Dummy cartridge case is tin plated brass. See: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/246183-1941-37mm-dummy-round/.

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I’ve had one of these for many years (with a blue practice projectile) and always assumed it was steel. So I just tried it with a magnet - definitely not steel!

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Brian put it straight again!
Indeed I also assumed it was steel. Just that I never was able to handle one of these.

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Tony, (or anyone else),

If you’re Gatwick airport way, there’s the Wings Museum http://wingsmuseum.co.uk/ who have 6 ex Soviet P-63 Kingcobra airframes, I don’t know if any of them have their cannons, but as an ‘obsolete calibre’ there’s always a chance.

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I have never been able to find the proper designation of this early dummy variant, which is simply described in several manuals as “drill”. There is also a more durable drill round made of iron -and later bronze- with steel head that was designated T31 and adopted as M23, but information about it same is almost non-existent and as I far as I can tell is only illustrated in the 1950 edition of TM9-1901. Examples must be quite rare.

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The manufacturer is Chase Brass & Copper Company, Inc.

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Here’s mine - 4th one from the left.

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Page 103 of the above posted manual says:

  1. Yellow - high explosive
  2. Blue - Practice,may be inert or may contain live fuse with black powder charge
  3. Black - Inert (dummy or drill) no explosive

Since Tony’s blue one has holes in the body and can’t fly, what’s the point of having live fuse? And IF it may not have black powder at all, what is the difference between blue and black anyhow?

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Here is more information on the early (iron) and later (bronze) variants of the M23 drill cartridge:

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