.38 spl functional dummy wadcutter with wood block?


#1

Struck me as unusual…as I decided to inertia pull a .38 spl function dummy (W-W 38 SPECIAL)(w/ drilled primer) bullet and found a small wood block in the casing…so I pulled two more…and they were the same.


I have seen wood inserts in dummy rounds, but those usually can be seen/ID’d thru case holes (this wood certainly cannot be seen).

I could understand a wood “spacer” in place to support the bullet in the case of repeated blows to a bullet’s nose running thru repeated function tests…but this is a flush blunt nose, (flush case mouth wadcutter) ?

The wood block appears the right length to support the bullet at its set depth…just wonder why?

Is it more for initial manufacturing/loading process or to support the bullet during it useful life?

PS the parallel scores on the bullet nose come from the inertia puller trap


#2

I “think” the wood block is still put into the wadcutter round simply because in order to function feed it into the barrel of the pistol requires alot of inertia. They can crimp it to keep it from going foward and the wood block keep it from going into the case.
As a side note if you put piece of cotton cloth about 1 inch square or a cleaning patch for say a 30 cal, shove that into the bottom of the inertia puller and that damage to the bullet, any bullet won’t happen.


#3

I am not a gun guy, but picture this vintage of a round being used in a “six shooter”.
Oh well…I have a few .380 ball rounds where the bullet has been pushed back in to the case…just didn;t figure it to be an issue with a wadcutter


#4

Repeated firing pin impacts can eventually move or loosen projectiles in Dummy or “Drill” rounds, even in revolvers. The wood Spacer is more of use in rounds used for semi-auto dummy cartridges, where much more inertia induced and contact with the projectile displacement is found during function, but it also happens with Revolvers.

There are semiauto pistols which can use the rimmed .38 Special cartridges, notably the Desert Eagle ( .357, but .38 will cycle), but these are the exception to the “revolver” rule.

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#5

Just a bit of lateral thinking but could it be to tale a woodscrew/small eye through the hole in the primer to make a keyring or pendant? Doesn’t sound that plausable but its all I can think of.


#6

A friend made me a cut for me from a 7,9 Mauser drill round. Unfortunately I have two left hands.

I gave him a round, and after a few weeks I get it back with some wooden peaces glowed inside the case. I asked him what that was and he told me these were inside the drill round, so they were also in the cut.


#7

[quote=“stevesummers”]I “think” the wood block is still put into the wadcutter round simply because in order to function feed it into the barrel of the pistol requires alot of inertia. They can crimp it to keep it from going foward and the wood block keep it from going into the case.
As a side note if you put piece of cotton cloth about 1 inch square or a cleaning patch for say a 30 cal, shove that into the bottom of the inertia puller and that damage to the bullet, any bullet won’t happen.[/quote]

I have a screwed up piece of toilet tissue in mine.


#8

Here’s my discombobulator for protecting the projectiles when using a kinetic bullet dislodger. It’s one of the “slip-on” pencil erasers. Just drop it down the hole. (Pointy end first) It traps the bullet and protects it in one easy step.


#9

Rick, I stuffed a piece of old newspaper down the hole and it works perfect too and will not allow the projectile to bounce back from the rubber and hit the case mouth.


#10

EOD

I never had an issue with that. 9 times out of 10, it traps the projectile, requiring a light tap to free it.

Rick


#11

Round noses too?


#12

A small piece of inner tube from a tire also works well to prevent bullet damage…

Randy


#13

I’ll go with the “9 out of 10 times”.


#14

This is my guess; if one of these dummies is dropped and hits the ground (or bench) base first then the bullet will set back into the case and probably raise a bulge thus rendering it useless. The wood will thus prevent a fumbled round being damaged in this way.

gravelbelly