3D Firearms


#1

A real storm brewing over 3D firearms. More BS flying back and forth than you’ll see in a Big Mac factory.

Many comments say there are no plastic bullets to go along with a 3D plastic pistol, so why worry. Those folks need to read the IAA Forum.

Chucky Schumer has his usual uninformed comments. “We can’t have an arms factory in every house that has a 3D printer. We have to do something. Harumph!”

Ray


#2

Or you could just make firearms the old fashioned way …
It is not a big mystery how.

Glenn


#3

Stonewall - howe true! The Israeli Hagannah and/or the Irgun had an ammunition factory in the basement of a Laundry on a Kibbutz, and even the British patronized the laundry and never caught on. I know for a fact from the Museum of the Holger Dansk underground in Denmark that they made a copy of the Sten Gun surreptiously there, and I think at least the Israelis also did.

If a need exists, someone will figure out how to do it.

Chuck Schumer…? No further comment as I might get thrown off the Forum.
However, think “Chuckie’s baaaack!”


#4

Remember the uproar over the Glock when it first appeared? - It’s all-plastic…can’t be detected by airport metal detectors… we’ll all be skyjacked…etc., none of which was true. I think it will be a long, long time before a 3D printer can produce a gun that wouldn’t blow up on the first shot, or could even fire that first shot. There was a CSI episode on the same 3D gun topic a couple of months ago, and it was an insult to the intelligence of anyone having even the most rudimentary knowledge of guns. How about banning numerically-controlled machine tools which really could produce shootable guns in mass quantities from someone’s basement or garage? Remember the Liberator pistol?


#5

It was presented last week. That’s why plastic guns are in the news again.


#6

The only thing I have seen is a video of someone that appears to be shooting a plastic gun (also called “The Liberator”), allegedly made by 3D printing, without any further information substantiating that it is actually a gun firing. And no details are provided.


#7

The concept of the internet eluded you the last 20 years or so?

Do a Google search on the subject ;)


#8

Maybe those politicians can get a brain printed for them on such a 3D printer?


#9

An additional issue is that the printers are getting cheaper, and the materials better.

Our legislation actually doesn’t have any problems with the new concept. Over here the production and modification of firearms is limited to registered gun smiths / arms dealers only. Private persons, even those with gun permits, are not allowed to create or transform firearms.

Since you can get a gun with a sixpack of beer in the US anyway, I doubt that the introduction of plastic guns will cause a big ripple there either.

But it does offer opportunities (and usually bad ones) for people in countries where economical and political stability leaves to be desired. Then again, those countries are swamped with illegal guns already anyway, kindly provided by the larger governments of his world …

And look at the UK. Guns are mostly banned, and they are going after each other with knives there now.


#10

It is sort of much ado about nothing. To “print” a plastic/ceramic gun (it would still need a steel barrel) with a 3D printer would be expensive, awkward, and fraught with potential difficulties, not least of which it is illegal without the correct license. The only person who might want to do this would be a criminal who could not otherwise purchase a gun legally, but much in the same way that illegal narcotics have been “illegal” to purchase for the past several decades, guns are equally accessible to criminals who are willing to pay the right price to the right person on the street. This street price is certainly lower than the price of a 3D printer which a criminal would not know how to use anyway, and a real gun would be infinitely more reliable. Are there any functional “printed” projectiles out there I wonder?

The side-notion of some sort of terrorist or assassin printing a 3D gun to bypass metal detectors is also silly since the gun would still need a hardened metal barrel, springs, and a few other parts to be able to fire more than one shot, or any shots in some cases. Hyping up non-issues with an element of fear is typical of anti-gun politicians who yearn to have the public grant them ever more control over guns in general, and has virtually nothing to do with the pseudo issues that are blathered about.


#11

In the “Liberator” model publicized last week, the ONLY metal part is the firing pin (needed the hardness to dent the primer sufficiently. The springs are a pair of circular springs (think a clock or wind up toy guts) made on the 3D printer. Apparently the barrel is just plastic from the printer.

Certainly not a durable or even desirable, or useful firearm. But, if it can fire a bullet with the force from an explosion it qualifies as a firearm, and will be treated as such. Of course the usual suspects will immediately predict mayhem and blood in the streets and demand they be banned along with any other types of guns that have any plastic in them.

The first automobiles were not very sophisticated either, but matured rapidly become pretty handy items. The 3D printer technology may eventually mature and make practice guns. I predict they could also “print” shootable bullets and even cartridge cases within a few years

Of course all they hysteria over a marginally functional 3-D printer gun ignores the fact that someone with a bit of tubing or pipe the right size and a few pieces of scrap metal can make a deadly “zip gun.” Or that “STEN” type submachine guns can be made with very primitive tools, and a muzzle loading gun can be made with little more than a hammer, anvil, hand drill and some files.


#12

Printer prices have already dropped below 600 Euros over here. When we follow the ink jet printer analogy prices will continue to go down and rather quickly. I paid about 1200 Euros for my first color printer. Now you get them for about 50 …

Also expect the materials to get better and more durable as time progresses. And if it will take about 50 cents to ‘print’ a barrel, who cares how long they will last. You will get throwaway barrel/ammunition combos that are disposed after each shot.


#13

I you tried to download the software to produce one of these guns you would get a knock on the door very quickly. Everything you do on the internet can be traced.
As others have said, gun plans have been available for years. Paladin Press comes to mind, but I wouldn’t want to order anything like that in the present climate using my home computer and paying for it with my credit card.


#14

The world is bigger than the USA. And these designs can (and will) do more harm in hands of people outside of the US, I’m afraid. Hiding one’s digital persona on the internet isn’t that hard. There are publically accessible proxies all over the planet.


#15

This seems to have settled away from anything cartridge collector related but future contributions in terms of “printed” 3D projectiles are welcome in a new thread more ammo oriented, so this will go locked for now.