410 shotshell "WCC 55 410 M35"


#1

Is this a military load? What is “55”? Year?
image


#2

Vlad

Yes and yes. Fairly common.

Ray


#3

Type Classification:
OBS - MSR 11756003.
Use:
Rifle/Shotgun, Caliber .22/.410 Bore, Survival, M6.
The cartridge is intended for use in survival weapons
against small game.
Description:
The cartridge case is all aluminum, and is loaded with
smokeless powder and No. 6 copper-coated lead shot.
Tabulated Data:
DODAC…1305-A055
UNO serial number …0012
UNO proper shipping
name …Cartridges for
weapons, inert
projectile
Weight …430 gr
Length…2.69 in. (68.3 mm)
Tracer …NA
Primer …Percussion
Fuze…NA
Explosive:
Type …NA
Weight …NA
Incendiary:
Type …NA
Weight …NA
Propellant:
Type …Smokeless powder
Weight …7 gr
Performance:
Chamber pressure…13,000 psi
Velocity …960 fps, 3 ft from
muzzle
Shipping and Storage Data:
Quantity-distance class/
SCG…1.4S
Storage code…Class V
DOT shipping class …C
DOT designation …SMALL ARMS
AMMUNITION
Drawing number…7553403
References:
SB 700-20
TM 9-1300-206


#4

Well Ray, for a non-shotshell kinda guy you pretty much covered that one except for the melting point of the case!
Oops, hope that’s not a “snide” comment.


#5

Chief

If there’s one thing I have learned in my 5 years of having a PC, it’s how to copy and paste.

And BTW Vlad - it’s a 410 Bore, not 410g. Right Chief?? ;) :0

Ray


#6

True, my Cannon-Cocker friend. For the puriest, .410 bore.

Those aluminum WCC shells were made when Olin had aluminum interest and played with lots of aluminum cases but it petered out when they sold off their aluminum assets. There are some other gauges, which were experimented with but never put into production. To my knowledge no one else has loaded aluminum in the US. Although I don’t know the range of dates but mine date from 1953.

Chief


#7

Vlad,

Always liked these specialty military shotshells. Nice little collector’s series, especially if you include the .22 Hornet loads that were also made for the survival guns.

Shotmeister,

The other Winchester aluminum items are another group that just asks for collecting! Here is a .410 commercially marked item (next to an M35) that likely remained experimental and was perhaps distributed through the “Franchised Gun Club” venue.

Dave


#8

A nice shell Dave, one I don’t think I have seen and certainly do not have.
I picked up a 14ga experimental at SLICS last year and would love to have one of the 20’s I know they made. I’m not sure what they did with the 12 ga but I’ve reached that stage in my collecting where nothing would surprise me coming out of the Olin labs since the Big War.


#9

[quote=“Shotmeister”]A nice shell Dave, one I don’t think I have seen and certainly do not have.
I picked up a 14ga experimental at SLICS last year and would love to have one of the 20’s I know they made. .[/quote]

Are you sure your 14 gauge is not in fact a 20 gauge ??
JP


#10

JP, technically you are correct because it’s the same diameter as a 20 but short and crimped. It’s headstamp is 14 ga. Winchester made a few Model 59 semi-autos chambered for the experimental shell and they were used for field test but later sold. It’s strictly experimental.
In this photo you can see the shells in the upper left corner and the gun at the top is so chambered.

I call it a 14 ga because that is what the headstamp says and Winchester called it so.


#11

Shotmeister,

Aluminum experimentals I have seen for sale/auction include a couple 12ga, the “14ga”, 20ga, and 28ga. as well as the .410 bore shown.

Here is a view of a “14ga” box and the two types of crimp I have found very much like your picture shows.

Here is a size comparison of the aluminum experimental “14ga” next to an actual 14ga.

Regarding the .410 military survival cartridges, I’ve often wondered if anyone has ever come across an account of the M6 (or other survival guns for .410 and/or .22 Hornet) actually being used by downed aircrew for the purpose for which they were designed. I figure they got a lot of travel time in during the Cold War but probably never got to see much of any use.

Dave


#12

Dave, I’d sure like to acquire more examples of those aluminum “14 ga” shells and especially the box but I have not seen them available. Thanks for posting those pictures.

I took mine out this morning and looked at it. While its the same base size as a 20 ga, the rim is quite a bit thicker so I doubt it would fit into a 20ga chamber.

Until I started activly collecting I had never seen or heard of the MK 6 guns so I am unfamiliar with where and when they were intended to be used. The Germans used drillings in some of their aircraft in the 1930’s and perhaps later but I assumed US forces only used handguns. A combination long gun would seem to be far more practical for a survival tool than a handgun.


#13

C’mon! We’re talking flyboys here. The idea that a USAF crew would use the M6 to forage for food is hard to believe. Not as long as they had a MasterCard and an IHOP nearby. ;) ;)


#14

[quote=“Shotmeister”]JP, technically you are correct because it’s the same diameter as a 20 but short and crimped. It’s headstamp is 14 ga. Winchester made a few Model 59 semi-autos chambered for the experimental shell and they were used for field test but later sold. It’s strictly experimental.
In this photo you can see the shells in the upper left corner and the gun at the top is so chambered.

I call it a 14 ga because that is what the headstamp says and Winchester called it so.[/quote]

Ok, it is what I thought.
Therefore what is the 20 gauge you are looking for ??

jp


#15

JP,

These have normal rim thickness. auctionarms.com/search/displ … &oh=216543

Dave


#16

[quote=“DaveE”]JP,

These have normal rim thickness. auctionarms.com/search/displ … &oh=216543

Dave[/quote]

ok Dave

this is a regular 20 gauge, isn’t it?

jp