44 henri flat short case


#1

Between this two hstps, which one is the scarcest ?
thanks
JP

!!! I wanted to post an image from photobucket but they have changed all !
under my images there is no more the 3 files (http, img, and the last one)

Could you help me please?
thanks


#2

JP…Above each photo in your Photobucket, you should see “SHARE IMAGE”…click on that and there should be a drop down box that shows a bunch of sharing options…there, you should see the “IMG” code for forums…Yes, I agree…they changed it and made it more complicated !!

Randy


#3

[quote=“30army”]JP…Above each photo in your Photobucket, you should see “SHARE IMAGE”…click on that and there should be a drop down box that shows a bunch of sharing options…there, you should see the “IMG” code for forums…Yes, I agree…they changed it and made it more complicated !!

Randy[/quote]

thanks a lot
these people are very stupid !
there was an very easy, and now it is more complicated and time consumming.
(But i must admit they are not as boneheaded as Google books which win the international price of stupidity)

Anyway here are the two hstps.
I want to keep the rarest in my collection.
Which one is it ?
Thanks
jp


#4

JP - I’m sorry that you are experiencing problems with Photobucket. But, I’m also happy, in a way, because I thought that I was the only one. I was beginning to think it was my fault.

Using the “Share Image” does not work for me. What I have to do is to log on and then click on “Home”. From there I click on “My Default Album” which brings up the image drop down options. I don’t know why or how that works. It will probably change in a few days and I’ll have to learn a new way.

Wow!! It looks like someone attempted to fire that one cartridge at least 14 or 15 times. I have found examples at Indian War battle sites where 4 or 5 attempts were made but nothing like that one. It is a very collectable cartridge for that reason alone, IMHO. Other than that I think the headstamps are the same, aren’t they?

Did it fire?? Or is it still loaded??

Ray


#5

[quote=“RayMeketa”]JP -

Wow!! It looks like someone attempted to fire that one cartridge at least 13 or 14 times. I have found examples at Indian War battle sites where 4 or 5 attempts were made but nothing like that one. It is a very collectable cartridge for that reason alone, IMHO.

Ray[/quote]
hello ray,
are you sure ?
jp


#6

JP

I have found many Henry cartridges like that, only not with that many firing pin strikes. Most will have 2 or 3 attempts and I have found some with 4 or 5.

The Henry rifle firing pin was a weak part, often breaking off one side. Cartridges fired in those rifles will show only one mark which confuses many collectors because they think it was fired in a different rifle. The mainspring was also weak which accounted for the cartridge not always firing the first time.

During the Indian Wars, the hostile Indians were always running out of ammunition and they would never throw away a mis-fired cartridge. They would attempt to fire it several times by rotating the cartridge in the chamber until it finally went off. If it still did not fire they would keep it, pull the bullet and save the powder.

In metal detecting Indian War battle sites, you would very seldom find a Henry cartridge that was still loaded. I’ve never found even one.

PS - cartridges that were fired in the Winchester 1866 carbine will often show the same types of firing pin marks.

Ray


#7

ok, thank you very much !
jp


#8

JP,
I’d keep them both, the one on the left for the reasons Ray mentions, and the other because it is a great example with the tool marks on the head. In addition, they do appear to be variations of the raised-H-in-an-impression headstamp, the one on the right having a bolder H (thicker legs and crossbar) as well as a smaller diameter impression than the one on the left. I don’t think anyone has done a study of such variations in these headstamps to determine which is rarer, when each might have been used, or even which company, New Haven Arms or Winchester, actually made them.