.44 magnum glow-in-the-dark loads - for real


#1

I came across Northwest custom projectile recently because their unique looking manstopper rds, and Hydra-shok type bullets caught my eye. And then I noticed they had one of their Manstopper type loads in .44mag that had glow in the dark projectile cavities. “Good for 10 years” says the listing. I’ll definitely buy a box:

http://customprojectile.3dcartstores.com/44-Caliber-Glow-in-the-Dark_p_46.html


#2

Interesting, what would be the percieved use for them?


#3

Haha, a legitimate question, which the manufacturer apparently knew would be asked, and so they list all of these somewhat laughable possibilities. These are direct from their website:

Uses include:

  1. An odd calming effect on excited, disorderly, or intoxicated suspects. Suspect would focus on the oddly glowing light and would potentially be distracted.

  2. Could slow the situation down. suspects completely focus on the glowing light and it may improve their behavior and or could potentially cause a distraction.

  3. Tracking a wounded suspect under low light conditions and or confirming who fired the shot.

  4. Proving to a suspect or intruder pistol is actually loaded.

  5. It could provide a safety factor for law enforcement to keep from discharging weapon at each other under low light conditions.

  6. Promotes protection of exposed lead core bullets from internal oxidation.

  7. Functional glow can be recharged up to 10 years.

  8. Can be recharged with a normal flashlight.

  9. NOT INTENDED FOR USE ON ANIMALS USED FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION.

Many of those above reasons assume that law enforcement might be using them, but of course there are virtually no officers whatsoever who carry .44 magnums as duty guns. The only law enforcement I know of who might consider it are Game Wardens since they sometimes have to put-down large injured game on the roadside or which are trapped in fencing, etc… with broken legs.


#4

Some other reasons for using these .44 magnum glow in the dark bullets, not shown by the manufacture:

Light yourself up like a Christmas tree so that your assailant can get a better shot at you.

Have an “on the edge” intruder that might surrender thinking you had a gun, but when he sees your glow in the dark bullets, which he will never have heard of in his life, he will think they are toys and blow you away while you are fiddling around trying to decide what to do next.

Make dumb juries and smart DAs think you are using some sort of special poisonous bullet or radio-active bullet (of course, that could be disproved if the manufacturer of these silly things is still in business) or the DA has bothered to submit them for that kind of analysis to the crime lab (or the crime lab has bothered to test for that).

Gawd almighty, what next? The sad thing is that if they made them in auto pistol calibers, I would probably be stupid enough to add them to my collection - Lew wants me to buy crystal bullets as it as. And yes, I have some wierd souvenir cartridges, one of which has some sort of curved stone, tooth, bone or something in place of a bullet. Came from South Africa, and I have no idea what the “bullet” is made of. A key chain dummy it is. But then, who ever said I had all my marbles in a row?

John Moss


#5

[quote=“JohnMoss”]
Gawd almighty, what next? The sad thing is that if they made them in auto pistol calibers, I would probably be stupid enough to add them to my collection - Lew wants me to buy crystal bullets as it as. And yes, I have some wierd souvenir cartridges, one of which has some sort of curved stone, tooth, bone or something in place of a bullet. Came from South Africa, and I have no idea what the “bullet” is made of. A key chain dummy it is. But then, who ever said I had all my marbles in a row?

John Moss[/quote]

Please! Let me catch my breath! That’s the funiet thing I’ve ever heard in my life! John, I have some .45 ACP’s with horse-dung cast bullets in them, for a mere $15 each… How many you want?

Chief Shot!!!


#6

In all honesty, I think the manufacturer knows it’s sort of a tongue-in-cheek sort of deal. I don’t believe they are actually trying to claim seriously that some of those things apply in the way that an Extreme Shock, RBCD, or Dynamic Research Technologies might try to. It looks like a side-project apart from their other hunting & premium defense bullets. I just love that I can get the original factory box & label so that many years from now I will have proof of the whole thing, after the glow-in-the-dark material dies that is. Somebody will be wondering why there is “dried white/green gunk” in the cavity of the bullet 20 years from now.


#7

20 years from now, I don’t think that’s the kind or location of “gunk” I’ll be worryin’ about. The color will be different as well. I hope. :-o


#8

In 20 years, the color and/or location of “gunk” will be the least of my worries.


#9

In 20 years I may experience a drain on my collecting budget since I’ll have 2 girls in college and/or on the cusp of marriage… yikes. Nevertheless; Aaron, Falcon, Duguid and myself can sit around with what should be a patriarchal Pepper and wonder about green gunk in bullets.


#10

20 years from now I’ll be “green gunk” and won’t have to worry about what that bullet in my South African key chain 9mm is! I won’t even have to worry anymore about whether the “U” on the headstamp really has an umlaut or not. :-) :-(

John Moss


#11

It seems to me that the only advantage would be to quickly locate a “bedside drawer” pistol in the event of a bump in the night. On the other hand, if its not suitable for game shot for human consumption. That indicates an admission of toxicity. toxic bullet = lawsuit and mutterings of radio activity.

Those of you who may have seen service in the UK and are familiar with the Ruislip area which held a massive US service population in my youth.
There was a factory at South Ruislip adjacent to the US hospital there which made aircraft instruments. When they redeveloped the site they had to remove four feet of soil to clear the radiactive waste resulting from the materials used to produce the luminous dials on the aircraft instruments. Even after that Kodak, who I worked for had a site there and it was said that film stock stored there developed background fogging presumably from radiation. It makes you wonder for the health of the workers.

luminous = radioactive = toxic. Toxic bullets are emotive, It looks to me like a lawyers delight.


#12

[quote=“JohnMoss”]20 years from now I’ll be “green gunk” and won’t have to worry about what that bullet in my South African key chain 9mm is! I won’t even have to worry anymore about whether the “U” on the headstamp really has an umlaut or not. :-) :-(

John Moss[/quote]

John, you don’t have to worry. Only the good die young. That is my premise for a long life. And I’m banking on it.