.45 ACP, SR or Blank?


#1

Another new .45 ACP (HP * .45 AUTO *). It has a short, black truncated bullet of 4 grams, that I was told was made of aluminum. It has “H&N” written on the side. I was also told it was possibly a German Huck product. Any help to identify the round’s purpose and origin would be appreciated.



#2

Are you sure that it is made of aluninium?
Looks like a teflon washed bullet made by H&N


#3

Jon - while I don’t know if there was any special intent for the blackened, plastic-coated aluminum bullet other than ball, I can tell you it is not a product of H. Huck/ N


#4

Hmmm…good question. I will take a closer look tonight and see if I can answer you.


#5

John, what would be the purpose of such a light bullet?


#6

Jon - anything I say in regard to the purpose of the light bullet would be nothing more than pure speculation, since I have not even confirmed the loading factory for these rounds, and have no documentation for them, other than knowing who the projectile-maker is from my own box and your confirmation thru your use of the initials “H&N”.

I have no idea why such a light bullet was loaded. The usual reasons for ultra-light weight bullets are to reduce range or increase velocity, or both. I can’t imagine the round being an AP, since it is of aluminum, and with its light weight, should have a very fast drop-off of its initial velocity.

My totally unsubstantiated, wild-guess, complete speculation is that it was made for short-range use. A lot of the ranges in Europe are indoors or in areas not by their nature safe places to shoot, but rather with the ranges constructed to make them safe. I believe that these are commercial cartridges - I know that the bullets sold as a component are - and I can’t think of any other particular excuse for their existence. Again, totally a guess with absolutely no documentation - not even “word of mouth.”