45ACP altered into?


#1

This box contains 45ACP formed into something else, something with a shoulder. Here is a reloaded “FA42” on the left and a regular Italian “GFL 45ACP” on the right. So, what is being emulated here?
image


#2

Vlad,

Without measurements, we can’t tell from the picture. There are several .40 caliber, which this looks like, made up by bottle-necking the .45 ACP case, such as .40 Super, etc. Some are wildcats, and a couple are factory rounds by small makers, like Triton, etc.

If I am off on the bullet diameter, it could also be what we always called the .38/45, although I have, I think, seen it called other things on this Forum. That was a .45 necked down to .38 for bullseye shooting in the center-fire category. It never made much headway against the good old .38 Special wadcutter load used in both fine target revolvers like the Colt OMM and the S&W K-38 (Model 14 as it was later called), and also in custom Colt autos, and in Colt .38 Gold Cup and the S& W Model 52.

Some measurements wsould help pin it down. As I said, the bullet looks a little fat in comparison to the case diameter to be a .38/45 - in the picture, to my eye, it looks like a .40 cal.

The .40 Smith and Wesson has been necked down to several different .38 caliber cartridges, by the way, as has the 10 mm Auto - necked to 9mm in the 9 x 25 mm Dillon, now a factory load by the Double Tap.

John Moss


#3

38/45 AKA 45/38 Clerke or the 400 Corbon (depending on bullet diameter) would be my 2 guesses, with the comment that it looks more like the Clerke design (but I haven’t had my morning coffee yet)


#4

What those guyz said.

If that’s the primer I see sticking out of the one on the left, that guy is asking for trouble. :(

Sloppy looking handloads IMHO. I’d be embarrased to show those to my wife, and she knows nothing about bullets.

Ray


#5

Yes - that box of reloads, as Ray says, would not fill me with confidence. It might even be hard to compare it to better-done ammunition by measurement, although we still need those measurements to give it a scholarly try.

John Moss


#6

Not a .38/.45 to my eye. Sure looks more like a .40/.45 to me. Looks like he used the wrong seating stem on those projectiles too. I always thought the .45 was necked down to get more velocity, so why the lead projectile?

AKMS


#7

There’s also the 41 Avenger… 45 ACP necked down to .41 cal


#8

Which measurements are needed for the correct determination? Let me know and I’ll post’em.


#9

Vlad - Overall ctg. length, bullet diameter as close to the case mouth as you can and still be only on the bullet, neck diameter, head diameter just above the extractor-groove bevel, and rim (head) diameter. If you can, as close as you can come to the height on the cartridge case, measured from the head, to the bottom of the bottle neck - where the bottle neck starts from bottom up on the case. The last is hard to do, but even an approximation will help, as the difference with many of these rounds based on other cases is the height of the bottle-neck. Some measure to the center, but that is harder to define, and as long as where the measurement is taken is defined, it doesn’t really matter, as it is only a guide to its position on the case.

John Moss


#10

Overall ctg. length - 30.6mm
bullet diameter as close to the case mouth as you can and still be only on the bullet - 10.5mm
neck diameter - 11mm
head diameter just above the extractor-groove bevel - 12mm
rim (head) diameter - 12mm
height on the cartridge case, measured from the head, to the bottom of the bottle neck - where the bottle neck starts from bottom up on the case - 15.5mm


#11

I’d say 41 Avenger. Just consider that lead bullets are commonly slightly larger than jacketed bullets. A .413" lead bullet would be .410" if jacketed.

As far I can see the neck is too long compared to the .400 Cor Bon or the .40 Super