.50/.30 type 7 Fleschette


#1

New member here (First post!)
I found a cartridge at a local gun show this weekend - item #5 in the picture. The seller was asking $100 for it. He told me it was an experimental round that was dropped because the "plastic around the darts left a deposit inside the barrel of the gun. I was hopeful that some of you might be able to provide more insight and let me know if it’s worth the money. He told me he had a letter explaining the history behind the round but the show was winding down and he was putting things away. The show will be back in a few months.


#2

Chip, nice selection you got there.
Though these are not related to flechettes (arrow shaped projectiles) but these are squeeze bore cartridges “only”.


#3

.50 BMG SALVO Squeezebore! Fun stuff. The premise was that five stacked copper cones (140 gr. each) would be fired from one casing. The barrel would taper or at the end of the barrel there would be an attachment that would continue the bore, but tapered from .50 caliber to .30 caliber. This would cause the projectiles to shed their wrapping and stagger while increasing pressure and velocity.

Other posters like Lew can give you details that would be more better.
SSB 3
Diagram showing projectiles being squeezed and separating

SSB 5
Picture of barrel with unfired cartridge, stacked projectiles, single projectile, and fired projectile

SSB 4
Diagram of squeezebore in the 9/30 pistol variant

SSB 2
Diagram showing barrels

SSB
Three types shown. The left is your example while the right is type 10


#4

The picture (above) is just something I found on the internet. Not part of my collection (sorry for the confusion).

So what I am seeing in bullet #5, the part that LOOKS like fleschette’s are really ribs on one of several projectiles contained in the cartridge?

The seller claimed a value of $250 but he was selling for $100. Any idea if this is a fair price (contingent on condition of coarse).

Thanks!
Chop


#5

Right, the skirts of the projectiles in yours are knurled.

As for pricing, Last I saw the Type 10s were $25/ea for pristine examples. I don’t know about Type 5s.


#6

I picked my example up for $20 CDN, but has black grease all over it… it isn’t the best example I’ve seen, but it is good enough for me.


#7

Welcome Chop

The most valuable ones would be #4 it your introductory photo, BUT ONLY if the bullets are magnetic, as those were the 1st variation. If not, its a common variation. So other than the 1st or an inert / dummy round these mostly trade in the 15-25 dollar range.

These type designations {on the .50’s) are not a formal military designation but one that Ron Fuch’s devised for collectors to easily describe the type of projectile in trades & such.

Also all of these have WW II headstamps and as such the headstamp is not much of a consideration as to a variation.

Think that is my photo of the three bullet variations.

Dave your variation with the black grease is I think excess asphalt-type case mouth sealant, & to me, a valid variation


#8

Pete thank you for that information! I will log that in my notes. I feel better about my particular cartridge now!

Regards,
Dave