.50 BMG dummies


#1

Have just bought an ex-danish army 12,7 mm dummy in what looks like zinc plated brass with red-painted indentations. Allegedly of american manufacture. Two other versions have been mentioned, a chrome-plated of the same type and one with a white plastic bullet instead of the metal one. Are there others (used by NATO-members)?
Soren


#2

A whole host. The Swiss have solids of brass or aluminum with knurled aluminum bands arouind the “body” The US round is 3 holes in a case with an empty primer pocket. The newer US dummy round is all chrome, with flutes. The earlier US design had only a single hole in the case, but with a dummy primer. One variant of the 3 hole dummy had the holes farther up the case than the current design and was nickeled as well. But the holes were moved down as they were covered when in links.

The Danish version you mentioned is very similar to the standard British Drill round, but the bullet is left natural, unplated.


.50 cal, M48A2 dummy rounds
#3

Here are a few British Drill and Inspectors’ rounds in .50 BMG and also .50 BAT.

Regards
TonyE


#4

Hej Søren
This is my danish .50BMG dummy. The bullet is magnetic, the case is non-magnetic. The case shows no headstamp and the ‘primer pocket’ is not coloured red (different to the british ones).

Is it similar to yours?

Best wishes



#5

This is the nicest one I have. It’s a one piece .50 BMG dummy made of solid, turned brass with a chrome finish. It’s hollow and has a thick case wall (approx. 4 mm). There are four holes drilled in the sides, two by two facing. Headstamp is “.50 DRILL” @ 12 and “M70” @ 6. This cartridge is made in Belgium by a civilian company although I don’t know it’s name. The primer is a solid rubber piece to absorb the impact of the firing pin.


#6

[quote=“Defender”]Hej Søren
This is my danish .50BMG dummy. The bullet is magnetic, the case is non-magnetic. The case shows no headstamp and the ‘primer pocket’ is not coloured red (different to the british ones).
Is it similar to yours?
Best wishes[/quote]It is the exact same type, Defender. I’ll post photos when I get it. The .50 BAT would be nice to have as a dummy, but I have only ever seen them as live rounds (red and yellow noses).
Soren


#7

That Belgian company made dummies with a similar headstamp in 9mm Parabellum, also.

John Moss


#8

I don’t know for sure if it’s really danish, but this one comes from Denmark and the whole making is ‘smelling’ danish to me.
The bullet is of wood with a “rod-like tail” down to the base of the case. This wooden part is fixed with a pin through the case neck. The case is common US (L C 6 5) and has 3 holes drilled in. It seems that a (danish) armourer or arsenal made this dummy with a fired US case (no primer placed).

You asked for other .50BMG dummies from NATO countries. On the picture is a french one. On the other side the case has a small hole drilled in. I don’t know when France started making .50BMG after the war, but 1949 could be early.



#9

I like to show 2 12,7 dummy rounds

on top a Belgiun one and on the bottom a Swiss one


#10

Gurojet, the “Belgian” one with the French practice projectile on looks much like an inert factory load.
I would not call it a dummy in the usual sense (a cartridge for instructing soldiers and testing weapons).


#11

This gets more and more interesting… :-)
The way the .50 BAT dummy was made would be the typical danish way, like the 7,92x57 Torben just put on Arma-Dania. Since the BAT spotter gun is a bolt-action mechanism it is a bit gentler on the cartridge than the BMG. A wooden .50 BMG bullet would be splinters in about three loading cycles the way an M2HB “handles” the ammo. (Which makes me wonder why the .50 BMG brass blank is so short, but that is another story).
Gyro, I see the swiss have a thing for wax-sealed cartridges… :-)
Thanks for pictures everybody.
Soren


#12

Soren, there is no wax on the dummy.


#13

[quote=“Defender”]Hej Søren
This is my danish .50BMG dummy. The bullet is magnetic, the case is non-magnetic. The case shows no headstamp and the ‘primer pocket’ is not coloured red (different to the british ones).

Is it similar to yours?

Best wishes


[/quote]

That drill round looks very much like a Kynoch manufactured round to me. Everything about it, the style of the flutes, the colour of the paint and the colour of the plating says “Kynoch” to me.

The Danes may well have specified no headstamp so there is nothing unusual about that. Also Kynoch had good contacts in Denmark.

Regards
TonyE


#14

Gyro: Is that laquer then? For a moment I thought it looked like the wax the swiss seal their 7,5 mm cartridges with.
TonyE: Yes, Kynoch had a good customer here :-)
Plated or painted? The finish has a fairly wear-resistant quality to it and paint would peel off when used, so its probably plated.
The mark around the case comes from the link it sat in. (marked B.P M.9) Bullet sightly magnetic, which imho is a ‘normal’ AP steel cored Projectile.
Soren


#15

Soren

no wax on that one …

regards
gyrojet


#16

The M8C spotting gun, as used with the 106 mm recoilless rifle, is a gas operated, semiautomatic gun, using 10 or 20-round magazines.


#17

Learned something new today. Have never seen one up close, and only seen one fired on Youtube where the camera was about 50 feet away…
Søren


#18

Defender and Soren

I have the same as shown & always thought it was British manufactured, but I’ve been wrong before.

Do you have any proof it was “issued” or of Danish manufacture?

thanks
Pete


#19

Mine is, and I am certain Defenders is, from the danish armed forces. As to where they were made, I cannot say.
If Torben can be persuaded to look it up in the “ammunitionskataloget”…?
Soren


#20

Great Thank you.