50 Vickers HV


#1

Thought I would share a few pictures of one of my favourite cartridges, the 50 Vickers. HV

1 Left to right

Ball 664
Ball 690
Ball 690
Tracer
AP
AP/t

2 Left to right

Incdy
Incdy
Incdy Tracer
Ballistic Standard
Proof
Dummy




#2

Very nice, and an interesting cartridge that isn’t seen very often in North America :-)


#3

A nice set, Ian! I like that round too.

Both single and twin-barrel AA mountings were made to take the Vickers Class D gun, as shown below (Pics from my web article on the .5 Vickers). Only a very few guns were sold for export though.


#4

Tony

Thanks for the pics, I have not seen the guns before.

kind regards

Ian


#5

Those photos look like Vickers photos taken on the test ranges at Eskmeals. The uniforms are typically Vickers employees, not military. Nice photos 'though.

gravelbelly


#6

Did the .50 Vickers use web belts or metallic links?

I recently saw a British made belt filling machine and was not sure if it was. 50 Browning or .50 Vickers, as it was only marked “.50 caliber”. Definitely set up for web belts. I really don’t recall enough about the mechanical details to provide much more info than that. Probably a great prize for some collector, but to most other people it would be about 100 pounds of useless junque.


#7

Very nice! Just curious, what does, “Flame Tracer” mean? Is that different from a regular tracer?

Jason


#8

[quote=“John S.”]Did the .50 Vickers use web belts or metallic links?
[/quote]
I don’t know about the .50 HV, but probably fabric, since the lower-velocity standard Vickers naval .50 seemed to use them, judging by the photo below.

The aircraft .50 Vickers would have used disintegrating-link belts, as the rifle-calibre versions did (from mid-WW1 onwards). Hardly any of those were sold, though.


#9

As I understand it, a flame tracer is the regular kind. It was called this to distinguish it from the ‘smoke tracer’ (for daylight aircraft use) which was the Buckingham-type incendiary which burned throughout its flight.


UK tracer vs "Flame" tracer
#10

[quote=“Tony Williams”][quote=“John S.”]Did the .50 Vickers use web belts or metallic links?
[/quote]
I don’t know about the .50 HV, but probably fabric, since the lower-velocity standard Vickers naval .50 seemed to use them, judging by the photo below.

The aircraft .50 Vickers would have used disintegrating-link belts, as the rifle-calibre versions did (from mid-WW1 onwards). Hardly any of those were sold, though.

[/quote]

The .50 H.V. normally used metal disintegrating links belts. There are photos of the links in Dolf Goldsmith’s Vickers book and on p.407 there is a picture of a Japanese .50 H.V. naval installation and the metal links are clearly visible.

Regards
TonyE


#11

Thanks for the explanation Tony W!

Jason


#12

[quote=“TonyE”][quote=“Tony Williams”][quote=“John S.”]Did the .50 Vickers use web belts or metallic links?
[/quote]
I don’t know about the .50 HV, but probably fabric, since the lower-velocity standard Vickers naval .50 seemed to use them, judging by the photo below.

The aircraft .50 Vickers would have used disintegrating-link belts, as the rifle-calibre versions did (from mid-WW1 onwards). Hardly any of those were sold, though.

[/quote]

The .50 H.V. normally used metal disintegrating links belts. There are photos of the links in Dolf Goldsmith’s Vickers book and on p.407 there is a picture of a Japanese .50 H.V. naval installation and the metal links are clearly visible.

Regards
TonyE[/quote]

Are you sure about that Japanese 50HV ?


#13

You have great taste. That is one of the most elegant (looking) ammunition designs ever produced.


#14

attached couple of pages from the ‘12.7 mm (0.5-Inch) Automatic Gun Class D*’ manual. They show cut-a-ways of ammo types available & metal links in adjusting machine. Sorry about the poor quality - I don’t have the manual now - only a poor quality copy. Original now in Pattern Room Library or whatever its called nowadays.


#15

Are you sure about that Japanese 50HV ?

CSAEOD: What do you doubt? That it is a Class D or that it is a Japanese installation?

Japan bought 48 Class D guns between 1929 and 1932.

Regards
TonyE


#16

The .5 Vickers MG belts were of a conventional webbing and brass strip construction, just like the .303" Vickers belts but bigger. These belts were used by both the Royal Navy and on some Armoured Fighting Vehicles. Later the change was made to steel Prideaux type links in Naval service. I have Mark II links by several manufacturers, some marked .5MG and some marked .5VMG. All are also marked IIN (Mark 2 Naval).

As far as I know, only disintegrating links were used with the 50 HV cartridge.

gravelbelly


#17

[quote=“TonyE”]
The .50 H.V. normally used metal disintegrating links belts. There are photos of the links in Dolf Goldsmith’s Vickers book and on p.407 there is a picture of a Japanese .50 H.V. naval installation and the metal links are clearly visible.[/quote]
Thanks for the info, Tony, I sit corrected! I should have dug out Dolf’s book before responding, but it always takes me a long time to locate anything in them. I wish he’d include an index…


#18

Unfortunately it is not Dolfs fault that there is no index. there is none in any of Blake Stevens “Collector Grade” books AFAIK (although I do not have all of them). I have moaned about this to him on a couple of occassions.

Regards
tonyE


#19

At one time, Blake Stevens was offering a separate index for the FAL trilogy. He has said in one interview that he really doesn’t have the patience to assemble them.

In the same interview, he claimed that the only people who bought the SPIW book were cartridge collectors.