.55 Boyes hstp


#1

Howdy. Can any one give me any info on this .55 Boyes hstp?
1943\WΠ\K4 (12\4\8).
The “Π” is Pi not the Cyrillic “P”.
“WΠ” could also be an upside down “Π” and an “M”

You’re into .55 Boyes aren’t you Falcon?
Any ideas?


#2

[quote=“falcon5nz”]Howdy. Can any one give me any info on this .55 Boyes hstp?
1943\WΠ\K4 (12\4\8).
The “Π” is Pi not the Cyrillic “P”.
“WΠ” could also be an upside down “Π” and an “M”

You’re into .55 Boyes aren’t you Falcon?
Any ideas?[/quote]

falcon5nz,

That sounds like a poor stamp of II (roman 2) rather than Pi. WII is the correct code for AP mark 2.

gravelbelly


#3

I, too, am sure that is “WII” for AP Mark II, and not any Greek or Cyrillic letter. It should be made by the Yeading Plant of Kynoch-ICI (K4).


#4

It is almost certainly an AP mark 2. It was made about 3 miles down the road from me at the Kynoch War Emergency Expansion plant at Yeading, Middlesex in 1943. When I say “made” it was certainly loaded there, but the cases and bullets could have been made at Kynoch’s Witton plant in Birmingham and shipped to Yeading for loading, I’m not sure.


#5

I believe there was a feeder factory to the Yeading plant in Hyde Rd Hayes at the Rudge motorcycle factory working on war work. I was told this many years ago but have never found it documented. The source was a local who grew up in the area and lived nearby during the war.


#6

That would make sense. But there is no sign of even a faint imprint from the bunter and the bottom is “flared” slightly. Looks like this:

Nothing else it could be?

Nick


#7

The British system of using the Roman numeral in almost all the varoius types of ammunition they produced, in all the different times of production life, and all the different factories will give the cartridge collector fits with all the different variations just in the Roman numerals seen on just one caliber, in one factory, in one year. Try looking closely at 9mm Para. from H /|\ N factory during WW II, or just pick up some .303’s from almost any factory. That this .55 looks like Pi is nothing other than typical war time production.
Bunters were expensive to make, and one showing a small fault like this would have been used until further problems arose.
With any large production war time factory a number of production lines would have been set-up and each line would have required a bunter. The hobs which the bunters were produced from would have been individual to some extent. This wear & tear from use in production, plus hob wear in producing the bunters can contribute to the often large number of variations, or faults seen on the cartridge head.
Sorry but you have a normal MK II A.P. With W being the normal British code for an AP loading, and the II being the 2nd generation or mark, of the accepted design.


#8

Thanks for that ID guys.


#9

I collect bunter errors and other do too. I have never seen this one on a 55.