.58" cartridges


#1

I have a selection of four .58" cartridges which I am struggling to positively identify. All are of different caselengths which I understand is a key identification feature with this calibre. Also the last round has a very definite taper. Can anybody help with identifying these rounds and, perhaps, a brief history for each?

From (L) to ® I think they are;

.58" Berdan Musket, .58" Remington Musket, .58" Berdan Carbine, .58" Musket


#2

Others will enjoy IDing these 4 standard loads.

While we are on the subject of .58s.

I don’t collect anymore but I can’t pass up a treasure either. I bought a collection this summer to obtain this nasty looking piece of copper and wood.

It is the only known example of this type of experimental dummy.

Please don’t ask for it as it has gone to a proper home.


#3

Hmmmm, that was a disappointing response for such a lot of work!
CSAEOD, if you consider these such ‘standard’ rounds I wonder why you didn’t just go ahead and confirm/correct their identifications?


#4

There are at least a dozen other folks ( likely more) who visit this site for whom that would be fun. This era and caliber is of little interest to me. At my age I spend my time on things which interest me. You could also buy Bill Gessner’s book ; " 58s are the greatest ". That tells more than you will ever want to know about these cartridges.

Patience will be rewarded.

My interest is mostly in projectiles which do more than punch holes in targets. Not many .58s have explosive , incendiary or tracer bullets.


#5

Jim,
I suspect you haven’t gotten any replies because there’s not much to add. The .58s are confusing at best, but I pretty much agree with your identificarions. Items 2 and 4 are variations of the same cartridge, which I believe would more accurately be called the .58 Springfield.


#6

Thanks Guy, that’s just the sort of feedback that I was hoping for!


#7

[quote=“GuyHildebrand”]Jim,
I suspect you haven’t gotten any replies because there’s not much to add. The .58s are confusing at best, but I pretty much agree with your identificarions. Items 2 and 4 are variations of the same cartridge, which I believe would more accurately be called the .58 Springfield.[/quote]

Do you have Gessner’s book ?


#8

[quote]GuyHildebrand wrote:
Jim,
I suspect you haven’t gotten any replies because there’s not much to add. The .58s are confusing at best, but I pretty much agree with your identificarions. Items 2 and 4 are variations of the same cartridge, which I believe would more accurately be called the .58 Springfield

DrSchmittCSAEOD wrote:
Do you have Gessner’s book ?
[/quote]

I don’t. I do have The Cartridge Collectors Notebook that I got from you which has the article (Early American Cartridges Profusion & Confusion) by Yust that covers the .58s briefly. Are you suggesting that I need the Gessner book?


#9

Yes. You have a long time yet in this and you should have a copy.


#10

Guy- I endorse CSAEOD’s recommendation. “.58’s are the Greatest” is highly specialized, but for someone with a very deep and broad interest in ammo like yourself, it will prove invaluable when dealing with cartridges in that caliber. Plus, a lot of inferences can be drawn which may be helpful with other cartridges of that era but in different calibers.

For someone only interested in 20th century centerfires, or .22 boxes, or shotshells it probably would never be used, but anyone interested in ammo (and guns) of the period 1855-1875 will like it.


#11

I guess I better drop a hint to Santa.