6.5mm Carcano... Is this a 'guard' round?


#1

Hello all. This round is part of a lot that I was given last week. The original owner of the ammo died a few years ago and kept no records unfortunately. All the rest of the Carcano from this lot were FMJs, but this one appears to either be a guard round, or a European SP bullet that someone handloaded into it. I consider the second possibility in part because the bullet is a little loose and has a good bit of ‘wiggle’ from side to side.
Headstamp is ‘A A’ over ‘C - 39’

Thanks for looking,
Allen


#2

It is a frangible M37 “MAGISTRI” bullet

Pivi


#3

Here is a guard load for the 6.5 carcano called “mitraglia” compared with a frangible bullet (first type,not like yours.Note the differences) and a commercial bullet by norma.
Your bullet came in 2 versions:copper and cupro nickel (maillechort) washed


#4

Here you have the copper washed variation of your round…


#5

Thanks Pivi!
I have a round like your ‘mitraglia’ in my collection as well, but I think that the entire bullet is cupro nickel plated. I never knew what it was called besides a ‘guard’ round.
I also have another round that I was told was a guard round that has an exposed, flat, lead tip, similar to the ‘magistri’, but is one piece without the ‘step down’ and has deep lines down the sides of the bullet. I am guessing that it must be a frangible as well.

Oh, and I also have a few of the rolled brass bullet rounds that I was told are blanks. Are they actually frangibles too?


#6

Hi,
yes,it is another type of frangible bullet.
You can find all 6.5 carcano variations visiting this web site (it is in italian,but you can choose english language and there are a lot of pictures)

worldwar.it/

Pivi


#7

Note:as you can see there is another type of so magistri called bullet.I don’t know why in that web site isn’t reported,but also your round is called magistri


#8

the rolled brass bullets are frangible for machineguns also called magistri


#9

Awesome! Thanks again Pivi!
My collection just got more interesting!
I have had the rolled brass bullet rounds since about 1990, before I even knew another cartridge collector. I had no clue what they were and lacked the resources to find out. I ended up cutting apart one of the bullets because the curiosity was killing me. I really regret having done that now.