6.5x55 DWM hstp question


#1

Can any one enlighten me with any info about this headstampI found on a 6.5 Swedish round
It reads(12/3/6/9) DWM/K/431F/K

Any info?

Nick


#2

Falcon - not sure what you want to know. The headstamp says it all. K DWM K 431F = Deutsche Waffen-und Munitionsfabriken A.-G., Karlsruhe, with 431F being DWM’s case register number for the “Schweden M/05 Kal. 6.5mm-S.” The headstamp style would indicate a commercial cartridge, but sometimes they aren’t. I have no idea if this is commercial or contract.


#3

Thanks John.
Wasn’t sure on what the 431F and K’s meant.

Nick


#4

Apart from supply to Sweden and Norway intitally in the 1890s ( where it would be a “DM or L” headstamp, the M’05 6,5x55 meets the criteria in dates for proper DWM ( incorporated 1896-7) and the Adoption of the 6,5x55 calibre M1900 Luxembourg Mauser Rifle.

So, apart from “top-up” contracts for either Norway and/or Sweden ( these two kingdoms formally separated in 1905), I would suggest that any DWM marked 6,5x55 ammo is actually Luxembourg contract supply. Only packets will prove this ,of course. The fact of “6,5-S” indicates a spitzer bullet ( which neither Norway nor Sweden adopted till the 1940s) I don’t know about Luxembourg?
With the adoption by Germany in 1903-4 of the Spitzer 7,9mm projectile, the spitzer was also introduced by DWM in most of its other ammo calibres ( 7,65, 7mm, etc) and some clients changed straight away ( as did the Turks, adopting the new flatter shooting projectile and converting rear sights with replacement leaves supplied by Mauser. (before WW I).

Every body has always concentrated on the “spitzerisation” of ammo in Germany, Britain and the US, but mostly ignored the other countries and calibres, such as 7,65 ( around 1905), 7mm ( between 1905 and 1925, depending on country) etc. Smaller countries with particular cartridges tended to stick with the older round nose (Holland, Italy, Spain, etc. ,but Combat use either in WW I or Colonial use led to adoption of spitzer designs later. War always hastens the adoption of better designs…

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#5

A question guaranteed to show my rank ignorance…

Did the Luxembourgeoise 6,5x55 have the same ‘thick’ rim as the Swedish sort?

Happy collecting. Peter


#6

The DWM Cartridge Case Drawings (Datig Copy) lists DWM.431F as being "Schweden Kal 6,5mm Gewehr und Maschinengewehr Model 1905 “S”. The S bullet is stated to have a diameter of 6,75


#7

[quote=“DocAV”]Apart from supply to Sweden and Norway intitally in the 1890s ( where it would be a “DM or L” headstamp, the M’05 6,5x55 meets the criteria in dates for proper DWM ( incorporated 1896-7) and the Adoption of the 6,5x55 calibre M1900 Luxembourg Mauser Rifle.

So, apart from “top-up” contracts for either Norway and/or Sweden ( these two kingdoms formally separated in 1905), I would suggest that any DWM marked 6,5x55 ammo is actually Luxembourg contract supply. Only packets will prove this ,of course. The fact of “6,5-S” indicates a spitzer bullet ( which neither Norway nor Sweden adopted till the 1940s) I don’t know about Luxembourg?
With the adoption by Germany in 1903-4 of the Spitzer 7,9mm projectile, the spitzer was also introduced by DWM in most of its other ammo calibres ( 7,65, 7mm, etc) and some clients changed straight away ( as did the Turks, adopting the new flatter shooting projectile and converting rear sights with replacement leaves supplied by Mauser. (before WW I).

Every body has always concentrated on the “spitzerisation” of ammo in Germany, Britain and the US, but mostly ignored the other countries and calibres, such as 7,65 ( around 1905), 7mm ( between 1905 and 1925, depending on country) etc. Smaller countries with particular cartridges tended to stick with the older round nose (Holland, Italy, Spain, etc. ,but Combat use either in WW I or Colonial use led to adoption of spitzer designs later. War always hastens the adoption of better designs…

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.[/quote]

Export in WW2 from DWM to Sweden?



#8

I have a cartridge clip that has baffled me for quite a while, this thread might be about to provide an answer.

On first glance it’s a regular 7x57 M’93 charger but, unusually, it will easily fit the slightly different rim of the 6,5x55 cartridge. It is of the later type with large spring tabs and a rounded section to the channel but it still has the ‘recurve flange’. I have 4 of this type that will not fit 6,5x55 and although every other dimension is nearly identical, on this one the distance from the inside of the channel to the flange is 2,50mm against the 2,40mm of the others.

A manufacturing discrepancy or is this a DWM marked charger for 6,5x55?

Has anyone found DWM 6,5x55 in sealed packets with chargers? Is this likely to be commercial or contract production? Am I barking to be worrying about such minutiae?


#9

Peter


#10

Peter –

Second thoughts! Is your charger 62mm long? If so it is probably DWM’s Ladestreifen 21A for the 10.75x68 Mauser Big Game cartridge.


#11

[quote=“JJE”]Peter –

Second thoughts! Is your charger 62mm long? If so it is probably DWM’s Ladestreifen 21A for the 10.75x68 Mauser Big Game cartridge.[/quote]

John,

Apart from the flange height it’s identical to regular M’93 7x57 chargers.

I’ve tried a 6,5x55 in all the ‘DM’ chargers with the simple ‘turned over’ flange and none of them will take the cartridge. All the 6,5x55 chargers I’ve seen, including the (presumably) more recent ‘070’ marked one have a recurve flange.

Taking the spring out of the charger means that a 6,5 cartridge will fit up to a point but most of them foul the flange on the case just above the extractor groove.

The mysteries of tinware…

Happy collecting, Peter


#12

Peter