7.5 mm Swedish Nagant

l have 100 boxes of these cartridges and l wonder if the primers are corrosive Mercury.Made by Gustav Genshow 1941 according to Jacob Brandt.

Can you show us a label and a photo of the base of the cartridge (to see the primer)?

Here you are.l have tried them over a chronograph that shows 820fps.No malfunktions.

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Thank you for the photos.
In my opinion theses boxes are from a much earlier time than the year 1941.
There is no indication of Sinoxid on the boxes. I am afraid the primers are corrosive.

Thank’s.

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@JPeelen Jochem, most of these boxes are indeed dated 1941. You may want to read this earlier discussion: Geco 25 pcs box for swedish nagant revolver

Piore, can you post a picture of the back of the Geco box showing the code? Then we can confirm the manufacturing date.

Regards,

Fede

isn’t there a manufacturing date on the box for a easy recipe?
newbie here so sorry if the question sounds stupid.

There is a lot number L450 but that does not say much.

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Thanks, date is May 5, 1941.

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Thank you Fede for noting the earlier thread.
I am a little confused regarding the lot numbers. L61N as well as L45O would be RWS codes from 1941 (letter L in position 1). As far as I know, Geco used its own system, which is still “unbroken” if I understood Lew correctly. Does that mean these boxes were filled by RWS?

As we now know from the Swedish data, these cartridges have a black powder load. So you need a lot of water anyway to clean the barrel, which also solves the corrosive primer problem.

Welcome to the Forum Jack
For numerous reasons ammunition makers do date their products. and for equally numerous reasons they do it in a code, which virtually all companies keep secret.
If a box has an actual date on it like perhaps a Match box, it is to assure the competitors they are using the correct / current ammunition for the match.
As storage now has a stronger effect on quality these days than time, the companies don’t publish a date on the box. The consumer might think it not to be good if it was perhaps 5? 10? years old. But perhaps if only a year old & stored improperly it might have “gone bad” to some degree.

In 20 plus years of firearm retail, I cannot tell you how many times people would not buy the “last” box of ammo, asking when “new” ammo will be delivered.
When we called them to come get the replenished supply, after rotating the stock putting the “old” box on top, they would buy the first few boxes often leaving the “last” box.