7,52х51 headstamps ID questions


#1

I get some new 7,62x51 headstamps in my collection and some help with correct identification

Headstamp #1:

  1. Is BF is a code of Fábrica Nacional de Munições de Armas Legeiras, Chelas, Portugal?
  2. Digits 32 - is a lot number?

Headstamp #2

  1. I think that this case was made in Iran, Am I correct?

Headstamps #3 and 4
I receive this cartridges together with small stickers with short description of it’s origin. Headstamp #3 was ID as Indian and headstamp #4 was mentioned as Nigerian. Is it correct? I think both cartridges was made at Indian Ordnance Factory, Varangaon. May be seller make a mistake with OFV - OFN headstamp?


#2

You don’t need any help, I believe you are correct on all 4 rounds.


#3

A couple of comments. On 9mm the BF headstamp shows up on covert ammo. It may have been made for Rhodesia after they declared independence and before the white government was thrown out and the independent Republic of Zimbabwe was established in April 1980. The date fits. This ammo could also have gone to Angolia which broke from Portugal in 1975 and went immediately into a civil war with one side backed by the Soviets (including Cuban troops) and one by the west.

The second headstamp is from Iran under the Islamic Republic. The letters on the right of the headstamp stand for the Defense Industries Organization.

Nice headstamps.

Cheers,

Lew


#4

When you see the symbol that is at the top of the Iranian headstamp, you know it came from that country.
It basically is the symbol represent “God” (“Allah”). It is on the Iranian Islamic Republic Flag. An Iranian neighbor of mine looked at one of those NATO headstamps I had in my dupes at one time, and said “God.” I thought he was making an exclamation because he couldn’t read it. He explained the symbol to me.

The OFV is always Indian. “OFN” (ordnance Factory Nigeria) is the headstamp I have seen on Nigerian ammo - .308 and 9mm. The 9mm is rare as the blazes - the .308 came into the United States in pretty large quantity some years ago.

I thnk I recall that one of our Portuguese friends on the Forum here said that even the FNM factory did not know what the initials BF meant on 7.62 x 51 and 9mm, but acknoledged making it for an undisclosed customer in Africa. I don’t think anyone knows what a similar load from FNM, also on NATO and 9mm, headstamp “ASC” means or exactly who it was for. It shows up
in RSA and even RSA-style dummy rounds are know with that headstamp. I always felt with the “A” in the headstamp that it was likely to have been for Angola, but I don’t have any documentation for that belief.


#5

Thanks all for interesting comments. This info is very important for me


#6

“ASC”? Angolan Special Contract??? just a Wild guess.

Nigeria: Most ammo from there is “OFN” ( Ord. Factory Nigeria-Kaduna)
but some later ammo has also “AFN” ( Ammunition Factory Nigeria); it is not clear whether this is the Kaduna Facility or another separate one.

The OFN 7,62x51 Blank ( labeled “7,62x65 Star”) is super-hot, and suited only for MG42/MG3 type MGs, and H&K G3 rifles with appropriate BFA fitted. Used in other rifles with a normal “Nato” BFA, it will take the bolt and return mech. apart. ( not enough muzzle venting.) Happens to FN-FAL-L1A1 rifles with a normal BFA (internal) for Plastic or RG Blanks.
Had one “Open out” the Lower frame, and lose an extractor into the bargain, during a re-enactment, last year.

Regards,
Doc AV
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.


#7

The OFV head stamps treshkin shows, looks a little “unprofessional” made to me.

The “BF” head stamped ammo is sold in large quantities as shooting ammo in Germany


#8

[quote=“dutch”]The OFV head stamps treshkin shows, looks a little “unprofessional” made to me.

[/quote]

May be the stamp for making headstamps of this cartridges was made by people which are not know English. I think if I will try to double Indian or Arabic words on the paper they also will look funny for Indians or Arab:)


#9

Not So, Treshkin.
India has a long history of the use of English language and printing from the middle of the 1800s…and the Ordnance Industry especially so.

The “poor rendition” is probably due to the fact that the OFV facility was only set up in the 1970s ( with help from Olin Industries (Winchester)—one of the few US -Indian co-operative efforts in ordnance, as India was pretty much reliant on European and Soviet assistance for many years.

At the beginning, the local Die makers and tool setters were new to the art…resulting in “roughly made” bunters…but this improved by the early 1980s…as examples show.
India has used “English” Fonts in Ammunition since the late 1800s, (Under British Supervision) and from 1949 (Independance) has continued the use of English generally ( even if it has an “Indian Flavour” in both pronunciation and usage), to the extent that it is the co-existant language with Hindi at Government and Middle class levels. More Indians speak English than the inhabitants of the rest of the world.( or equal to).

Regrads,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
Brisbane Australia.


#10

[quote=“DocAV”]Not So, Treshkin.
India has a long history of the use of English language and printing from the middle of the 1800s…and the Ordnance Industry especially so.

The “poor rendition” is probably due to the fact that the OFV facility was only set up in the 1970s ( with help from Olin Industries (Winchester)—one of the few US -Indian co-operative efforts in ordnance, as India was pretty much reliant on European and Soviet assistance for many years.

At the beginning, the local Die makers and tool setters were new to the art…resulting in “roughly made” bunters…but this improved by the early 1980s…as examples show.
India has used “English” Fonts in Ammunition since the late 1800s, (Under British Supervision) and from 1949 (Independance) has continued the use of English generally ( even if it has an “Indian Flavour” in both pronunciation and usage), to the extent that it is the co-existant language with Hindi at Government and Middle class levels. More Indians speak English than the inhabitants of the rest of the world.( or equal to).

Regrads,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
Brisbane Australia.[/quote]

It was only a joke from my side. Of course you are right about British influence in India. Some times ago I have had a close relationships with some Indian manufacturers of printing equipment. And some Indian men (the owners of the companies and top managers) looks and speaks like pure British gentelmens.