7.62 NATO made by CIA for Laos

I was gifted this box by a nice Atlanta collector with the following story (let’s see if I can remember). CIA wanted to arm Laotians during Nam era to fight on the Right Side (opposite to the Dark Side). But Laotians are slightly built and can’t tolerate M60 recoil. So CIA got the top of the duplex (multi-ball) projectiles (the one which looks like a cup) and put them in as a single projectile. These “cups” are light and produce less recoil in full auto mode. Did I get it right, Lew? Anybody wants to add to this story?

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Vlad,

See HWS III pg. 193. XM256 headstamped (+) FA 66. Plated solid mild steel projectile with white tip.

Nice carton!

Dave

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Anybody with images of the exact cartridges (and hs) for Vlad’s box?

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I met Col Burkett in San Antonio shortly after I retired and about 8 or 10 months before he died. I visited him two or three times a week in the months before his death. An incredible career. Shortly after I met him at a gun club I joined after retiring, I mentioned I collected ammo, and at the next meeting he brought me 5 or boxes of this ammo and told me the story, which is the one I told Vlad. He was a very impressive guy and I regret we only had a short time to get to know each other and hear his stories.

Cheers,
Lew

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Jim, thanks a lot for the image!

Lew, I remember the interesting story you have told me about the aluminum cased variant with the “MATCH” headstamp.

EOC, It was from the same source, In fact he had one or two aluminum case rounds with white bullets which were likely from the same project. The MATCH bunter was used to increase the work hardening of the case head by using more letters in the headstamp.

All this work was done at FA for the Agency, not by the agency itself. Col Burkett talked about sitting in the cafeteria with a couple of engineers and sketching things on sheets of paper, and the engineers would go out and make a few for testing.

By the way, Col Burkett, when he was a Lt Col commanding the Foreign Weapons Technology Group, or some similar name, was responsible for identifying, testing and writing reports on new German. weapons. Immediately after Normandy they located the remainds of six StG 44s, all partially destroyed (bent barrels) or incomplete, and assembled from these two operable weapons which he fired and wrote the original report on these weapons. He showed me his copy of that report.

Cheers,
Lew

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