7.62 NATO Plastic Blank Mfg?


#1

I think this was on the old Forum (by Ray?) but I can’t find it with my limited search skills. No headstamp. Who manufactured this one?

Thanks,
Dave


#2

Out of my field, but the black primer seal, the “look” of the primer and the head, suggest to me that is could be French. Maybe somewhere to start.

It is almost identical to 7.5 French blanks I have had go through my hands.

There are 9mm equivilants - same black seal and same look to the primer. They were at least boxed by S.F.M. in France. I am not sure if S.F.M. made the whole 9 mm cartridge though, as plastics are usually a specialty thing.

Hope this helps a little, and starts off a discussion on this item, even I prove to be wrong.

John Moss


#3

I believe that this is a French blank. While the associated box doesn’t have SFM on the box, the layout and style are virtually identical to that seen on boxes of 5.56mm blanks from SFM.

NATO Dave


#4

[quote=“NATODave”]I believe that this is a French blank. While the associated box doesn’t have SFM on the box, the layout and style are virtually identical to that seen on boxes of 5.56mm blanks from SFM.

NATO Dave[/quote]

SFM manufacture.
They bought the Norvegian patent to make ammo in 9 para, 30-06, 30 Nato, 7.5 Mas, 50 Browning

JP


#5

Thanks all for that information.

John,

Pretty darn good analysis for an item “outside your field”!

Dave E.


#6

DaveE. I really don’t know much about NATO, but I just went by the 7.5 French rounds I had in my dupes from time to time, of known identity, and the same type in 9 mm, also with identity known to me. There are, of course, a lot of cross overs in cartridge characteristics from caliber to caliber, which is why when trying to identify something, it is helpful to “think outside of the box,” that is, look at other similar items not necessarily of the same caliber. Of course, some times you can’t, if you don’t have those items, or haven’t seen them, or if no similar items exist.

This works even with headstamps. I have identified several previously unknown headstamps, as have most other collectors advanced in any given field, simply on the basis of the letter characteristics and layouts of headstamps. These give me a hint as to the possible origin, and therefore, a place to concentrate my research.

Playing detective (probably “defective” would be a better word in my case) is part of the fun of collecting, and sometimes a guess brings out the facts from those more knowledgeable.

John Moss