7.62 Russian to 8mm Murata


#1

Another one of my favorites. A Russian 7.62x54R case, captured in the Russo-Japanese War, and converted by the Japanese to 8mm Murata. I love the raised Russian headstamp along with the impressed Japanese.


#2

Are the 7.62x54R and 8mm Murata rounds different only in bullet/neck diameter, or did more dimensions have to be changed?


#3

No, case was fully resized.


#4

Were these made from picked up fired cases or captured stocks of live rounds? I guess the base diameter is the same as 7.62 x 54R. Any chance of a photo of this round next to a 7.62 x 54R from the side?


#5

Interesting headstamp! My 8mm Nambu blank with red wood bullet has a Japanese-character headstamp pretty much like this one, except that it has only one “tick” mark above the curved entry. Never have seen a satisfactory explanation of what it means.


#6

The Japanese Character mark (Kanji) is found on a lot of Japanese ordnance supplies (Clips, large calibre shells, fuzes, etc) is simply an “inspector’s mark” signifying approval or acceptance for service.

At the time of the Russo-Japanese War, many nations still reloaded and re-manufactured ammunition; (replaced the primers, mostly); so this could definitely be "re-manufactured " ammo. By 1906, Japan was well on the way to full issue of the Type 30 and the new type 38 Rifles and their relative ammunition, so facilities which had made new 8mm Murata ammo would have been changed over to making 6,5mm ammo, and any requirements of 8mm Murata ammo could have been filled (for training) by either reloading existing 8mm M cases, or converting the 7,62x54R case ( The Murata case is also 53-54mm long, so the Russian case would probavbly be a good fit in a Murata chamber. For training ammo, you just have top get bullet diameter right, the case specs can be out a bit, as long as the case fits the chamber.
( We reloaders do it all the time, but that is a “taboo” topic here…).

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics


#7

I know nothing about civilian ownership of guns in early 20th Century Japan, but somewhere down the line I was told that these re-used cases were for commercial production.