7.62 x 51 with plastic bullet


#1

A trading buddy sent me an assortment of boxed ammo, which included this box of South African 7.62 x 51. I had not seen one of these with the plastic bullet. Is it anything to get excited about??


#2

hello
i think is a copy of french cartridges “balplast tir reduit” (plastic bullet short range)


#3

Guy, these are pretty common except for the rebated rim version, I think that only occurs on a 75 date. If you find something similar with a light blue plastic bullet, then you have something to get excited about.


#4

Thanks ammogun and Will.


#5

So were these short-range rounds, anti-riot or another purpose?

Why do some have a rebated rim?


#6

Here are examples of the blue plastic bullet short range cartridges plus the rebated rim orange version (second from right). I have the same question as Falcon - why the rebated rim?

Headstamps (l to r) are
A78 7.62 R1M1
A80 7.62 R1M1
PMP 77 7.62 A1
A75 7.62 R1.M1.
PMP 72 7.62 A1

NATO Dave


#7

The rebated rim cartridges are supposed to be used with a special “light” breech which often is just a blow back system without locks in order to work in automatic/self loading mode with the small propellant charge of such cartridges. These breeches are NOT to be used with life ammo (full load) so these breeches have an altered bolt face which will not allow life rounds with “original head diameter” to be fired in/with such a practice breech.

This is mainly seen with DAG made PT cartridges and some other countries like with French 5.56x45 (also with plastic projectiles).

Anybody out there who knows who invented this (maybe DAG?)?


#8

Rebated rim case are designed for special breeech blocks meant for training purposes only, and these can’t be used with normal cases (like the M2 blow-back for 5.56x45 rebated rim cartridges used in the AR-15 type rifles). Also, the rifle will work in normal semi-automatic mode like if using ball ammunition (also in automatic mode, but the rate of fire would be too high).

The first short range cartridges with rebated rim cases were designed by DAG in the early 1960’s for the G3 rifle and the training breech block was designated “Übungsverschluß”.

If you check the rim diameter of a typical DAG white or blue short range cartridge (like the DM18) you will notice that this is a rebated rim case too.


#9

Sorry to interfere, but…

-The orange plastic bulleted “balplast” as we call them here were absolutely not “copies” of the french ammo, but resulted from a regular licence agrement with the french maker (SFM).

-Rebated rim 5,56x45 were of a similar breed, with a licence agrement on the “lightbolt”…which had been tried first with the French FAMAS rifle.

-A same story for the first 20x82 Mauser rounds in So. African use, these cartridges being primarily imported from Manurhin before embargo.

PR


#10

Same idea is used for the US M16/M4/M249 weapons when firing marking ammunition like Simunition. The normal gas-operated bolt and carrier is replaced with a blowback bolt. The possibility of firing a ball round with a blowback bolt in place has to be prevented, and this is one way. But it works well. An M16/M4/M249 so equipped fires very reliably in full auto mode using the correct ammunition.


#11

To NatoDave:
The blue plastic bullets were all loaded in “PMP 71 7.62 A1”. The dates your cases have are much too late for this experimental phase of development. There are at least 14 different versions of this blue bullet. Loaded rounds are really not common, even the loose bullets are difficult to find.


#12

hello
thank to correct my mistake about the "copy of french cartridges"
i don’t know that is a licensed made cartridges


#13

[quote=“Will”]To NatoDave:
The blue plastic bullets were all loaded in “PMP 71 7.62 A1”. The dates your cases have are much too late for this experimental phase of development. There are at least 14 different versions of this blue bullet. Loaded rounds are really not common, even the loose bullets are difficult to find.[/quote]

Will
Thanks - disappointing but good to know

NATO Dave